American History Too!active
Pulling back the curtain on all the great debates and controversies of American History.
Country Of Origin |
United Kingdom
Premiere Date |
2014-10-04
Frequency |
Monthly

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49 Episodes Available

Average duration:00:53:26

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Picking up from last month's episode on Native Americans and slavery, this month's episode with Reeta Humalajoki (University of Turku) explores the relationship between the American government from the civil war to the present day.  We explore the various policies from assimilation to termination that characterised this fractious relationship, all the way up to the recent policies pursued by the Obama and Trump White Houses.  How much say did have Native Americans had in shaping their fate? And how was this all affected by the Civil Rights era? And why is Richard Nixon one of the most laudable presidents in relation to Native American affairs?Reetta guides us through these issues and much more in this tour de force podcast!Cheers for listening,Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On Episode 46, we're joined by the University of Hull's Edd Mair, who discusses his research on Native Americans as slaveholders during the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly the Seminole tribe of Florida.We have a wide-ranging discussion of the history of Native American slavery - both as enslaved people and as slaveholders themselves. Why did the enslave Africans? Was it out of necessity or more nefarious reasons? As we find out, some Native Americans even held similar racial beliefs to those that would become common among white people during Social Darwinism's heyday.  Mostly, we get at the question of whether or not Native American were more benevolent slaveholders in comparison with their white counterparts - a common myth that was accepted in American society.We'll be back next month with a follow-up episode on Native Americans when we discuss how they fared during the 20th century.Cheers,Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On Episode 45, we are joined by UCL's Nick Witham (@ndwitham) to examine the turbulent events of 1968 in the United States. 50 years on, what are the legacies of the 365 days of tumult? What happened? What impact did it have on various groups in society? And how important were the 'Sixties' more broadly? We guide you through the assassinations, cultural upheavals, Vietnam protest, and - of course - the music of 1968. Thanks again for listening. We'll be back next month to examine Native Americans and slavery.  Cheers,Mark and Malcolm Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On Episode 44 of American History Too! we're joined by TWO very special guests - the University of Exeter's Rachel Pistol (@PistolRachel) and the University of Edinburgh's Tim Cooper (@tscooper11) - to discuss how Asian-Americans have fared in American society since the late nineteenth century to the present day.  Discover more about the so-called 'Yellow Peril', Japanese Internment during World War II, and why these issues are still relevant to modern day America. Look out for a NEW kind of AHTOO podcast landing in your feeds in January. Until then, thanks again for listening. Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On Episode 43 of American History Too! we delve into the United States' topsy-turvy relationship with its southern neighbours. The US has had a fascinating and complex relationship with its American cousins and joined by the University of Manchester's Tom Tunstall Allcock (@TunstallAllcock) we trace its highs and lows from the Monroe Doctrine in the 1800s all the way to the 1960s and the LBJ administration's 'Man in Latin America', Thomas Mann.  We examine JFK's 'Alliance for Progress' and whether LBJ really deserves the blame for its collapse or not, and how the 1965 intervention in the Dominican Republic fits into the wider story of Johnson's presidency. Tom also treats us to the story of LBJ, a sheepdog, a monkey, and the West German Chancellor - stay tuned until the end for that one! We'll be back in December with a special episode on Japanese-Americans.  Thanks again for listening. Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On this month's episode we're joined by Lancaster University's politics lecturer Richard Johnson (@richardmarcj) to discuss five pioneering black politicians who ran for election in the decades before Barack Obama's ascension to the White House in 2008: Ed Brooke, Tom Bradley, Douglas Wilder, Harvey Gantt, and Carol Moseley Braun.   The podcast begins with a clip of Richard's interview with Braun in which she discusses her views on race and politics.   Throughout the discussion Richard reflects on whether Obama was a political unicorn with his appeal to white and black audiences; how these five pioneers navigated the choppy waters of racial politics and what their candidacies tell us about the country in wich they were running; and finally, whether their candidacies - and, in some cases, spells in office - were able to inspire change in American society.   Thanks again for listening, we'll be back next month, discussing barbeque diplomacy and Vietnam (all will be explained).   Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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(Our guest this month, Hannah Rose Murray, @Hannah_RoseM , frederickdouglassinbritain.com) One spring evening in 1838, formerly enslaved African American Moses Roper spoke to a crowded audience in Leicester, and during one section of his speech, declared: "Many will say “This is the slaves’ side of the question. The slave-holders would tell a different story.” You have heard the slave-holders’ story 250 years ago. Now, I think it is time for the slaves to speak." In an extraordinary chapter of the antislavery movement, hundreds of black activists – many of whom were formerly enslaved – echoed Roper’s bold decision to tell the truth about slavery. Many of these individuals sought temporary reprieve from American soil, others permanent; some raised money to free themselves or enslaved family members; others sought work with varying success. Black men such as Frederick Douglass, William Wells Brown, Josiah Henson, and women such as Sarah Parker Remond lectured in large cities and tiny fishing villages, wrote narratives, stayed with influential reformers and ensured millions of words were written about them in the newspapers. The Victorian press is littered with coverage of their speeches, from the John O’Groat Journal to the Royal Cornwall Gazette, alongside with accounts of audiences cramming into tiny churches or town halls to cure an insatiable appetite about American slavery. Even by the end of the nineteenth century this appetite had not abated. Activists such as Ida B. Wells built on the precedent set by Moses Roper and declared to a Leeds audience in 1894 that “it was her mission to tell the black people’s side of the story.” In a powerful and succinct summation, Wells echoed the reason why African Americans travelled to Britain: to champion their testimony against slavery and its legacies, and challenge white supremacy.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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For Episode 40 of American History Too! we've fired up the Translatlantic cables to chat to Dixie State University's Jeremy Young (@jeremycyoung) about his work on the 'Age of Charisma' between 1870 and 1940. Jeremy guides through what it meant to be a charismatic leader and, indeed, a charismatic follower during this era. Why were these leaders both appealing and yet simulatanously destined to lose in presidential elections? Why did they die out from 1940 onwards? And who was the first ever radio star in the United States? (hint: it's not who you think it is!) We touch on all these issues and much more. Thanks again for listening and we'll be back next month. Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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50 years on from the 'long, hot summer' of 1967 we look back at the race riots that became a common feature of the 1960s landscape in the United States. Should we call them riots? Why did they happen in the same decade in which African-Americans achieved the greatest legislative progress in 100 years? How did politicians responded to America's burning cities? And do they hold any lessons for modern America? These are just some of the questions we seek to answer about the riots. The podcast begins with an NBC broadcast you can watch here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hOoW0U6g_E Thanks again for listening. Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On this month's episode we're joined by Fraser McCallum to discuss the paranoid cinema of the 1970s that emerged in the midst of assassinations, Watergate, and an array of government misdeeds that had been exposed in the previous decade. In particular we examine The Conversation (the trailer for which begins this episode, 1974), The Parallax View (1974), Three Days of the Condor (1975), and - of course - All the President's Men (1976). We discuss why these films emerged, what they say about the United States during this era, and consider whether we might see a reemergence of the genre in the wake of Trump. n.b. There is a slight issue with one of the microphones that crops up ever now and again, but it shouldn't be too distracting. Thanks again for listening and we'll be back in a few weeks with an episode looking at the 'long, hot summer' of race rioting in 1967. Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On Episode 37 of American History Too! we look at a man and an organisation who encapsulated much of what 19th century America was about: immigration, westward expansion, big business, labour relations, war, and politics. We examine Allan Pinkerton and the ‘eye that never sleeps’, the Pinkerton National Detective Agency.   Scholarship Christopher Andrew, For the President’s Eyes Only: Secret Intelligence and the American Presidency, from Washington to Bush (New York: HarperCollins, 1995) Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, The FBI: A History (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007) Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, We Know All About You: The Story of Surveillance in Britain and America (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017) Frank Morn, The Eye That Never Sleeps: A History of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1982) S. Paul O’Hara, Inventing the Pinkertons; or, Spies, Sleuths, Mercenaries, and Thugs (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016)Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The 16th President of the United States, unlike so many of his fellow nineteenth century White House occupants, has not been lost to History. Indeed, his name lives on as the Capitol of Nebraska, as a popular car brand, and as a name for one of America’s two political parties. Beyond the United States, his legacy also has a powerful reach. Here in Scotland, there is statue of him in Edinburgh, while in 2009, the Rwandan government saw fit to issue a stamp bearing his face. And that face, which he took great pleasure in mocking for its ugly features, has been included at one time or another on the 1, 5, 10, 20, 100, and 500 dollar bill. It is sculpted on Mount Rushmore along with Washington, Jefferson, and Theodore Roosevelt. And, perched high upon a grand seat and surrounded by Roman columns and his most famous words, he gazes across the National Mall at the Congress of the United States, acting as a symbolic conscience of the nation. We are, of course, talking about Abraham Lincoln. Today, on American History Too!, joined by the University of Edinburgh's Cat Bateson we ask whether the so-called Great Emancipator deserves such lofty and widespread recognition, and we also examine the uses and abuses of Honest Abe’s legacy since his assassination on Good Friday in 1865.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On Episode 35 of American History Too! we're joined by the University of Hull's Rachel Williams to discuss the role that religion played in the American Civil War.   Rachel guides us through the evolution of religion from the founding years through to the antebellum era and the effect it had on the emerging country. What effect did relgion have in justifying slavery in the South? Has religion in the US benefitted from not having a predetermined state religion? And what was the effect of the Second Great Awakening? We then discuss how religion shaped the experience of the Civil War and how it impacted both the Northern and Southern cause. Finally, Rachel reflects on how the Civil War experience impacted upon religion going forward and offers us a sneak preview of next month's episode. We hope you enjoy the conversation as much as we did. Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On Episode 34 of American History Too! we're joined by the University of Birmingham's James West (@ejwestuk) to discuss the history of Black History Month and the debates that surround BHM. Over the course of the hour we get stuck into the legacy of the Civil Rights movement, the origins of Black History Month and whether it is viewed in a positive light by black Americans. Finally, James offers us a fascinating insight into how corporations have advertised during BHM, and whether their efforts are cynical or genuine.   Our apologies for the recording quality on one of the microphones for this episode - snowstorms and internet connections don't go well! Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On Episode 33 we turn our attentions back to the CIA and pick up where we left off in Episode 31. Joined by the University of Reading’s Dafydd Townley, we whizz through the CIA’s successes and failures in the 1950s and 1960s, when the agency was given free rein by Congress to do as it pleased without questioning. With the Vietnam War and the Watergate Scandal fuelling public distrust in American institutions, however, it was only logical that the CIA – for so long shrouded in mystery – would come under the microscope. In 1975, three separate investigations were launched into the CIA, with the notable being the Church Committee, that raised new and troubling questions about the nation’s premier intelligence gathering vehicle. In this episode of American History Too! we investigate the Committee’s findings and dig deeper into what would become known as the ‘Year of Intelligence’. We’ll be back next month with an episode that will overlap with Black History Month. Until then, thanks for again listening! Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In 1942, GIs who were being deployed to Britain were presented with a clear set of official instructions which warned them what they could expect to find when they reached wartime Britain: ‘‘You are coming to Britain from a country where your home is still safe, food is still plentiful, and lights are still burning. So it is doubly important for you to remember that their British soldiers and civilians have been living under a tremendous strain. It is always impolite to criticize your hosts. It is militarily stupid to insult your allies.’ – Instructions for American Servicemen (1942) Equally, in December 1943, the novelist George Orwell wrote in the Tribune that ‘It is difficult to go anywhere in London without having the feeling that London is now occupied territory.’ Both extracts give a sense of uneasy alliance between two nations which have all too often been portrayed as locked together in a ‘special relationship’ for seventy odd years. But like all relationships, alliance warfare between the US and the UK underwent periods of severe strain as well as harmonious efficiency. In this podcast, with the help of Dr Frances Houghton (University of Manchester) we’ll be discussing the extent to which the 3 million US personnel who passed through Britain between 1942-45 were really perceived as ‘overpaid, over-fed, over-sexed, and over here’ in wartime Britain. A huge thanks from both of us for tuning in for another year. We can't wait to get back to podcasting in the New Year, and we've already got many esteemed guests lined up for 2017 to discuss more fascinating topics in American History. Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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World War II is over, the Cold War is just beginning, and the United States is set on winning hearts and minds - and foreign elections - by any means necessary. On episode 31 of American History Too! we travel back to the mid-1940s and tell the story behind the creation of the CIA's covert operations programme. From tales of Jesus to a disaster in Bogota, the programme's birth was an interesting one to say the least. Thanks again for listening and we'll be back next month to discuss the experience of American and British soldiers during World War II.   Cheers, Mark and Malcolm    Scholarship Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, The CIA and American Democracy, 2nd edition (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998) Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, Cloak and Dollar: A History of American Secret Intelligence (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002) Steven Long, The CIA and the Soviet Bloc: Political Warfare, the Origins of the CIA and Countering Communism in Europe (London: I.B. Tauris, 2014) Kaeten Mistry, The United States, Italy and the Origins of Cold War: Waging Political Warfare 1945–1950 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014) Christopher Moran, Company Confessions: Revealing CIA Secrets (London: Biteback, 2015)Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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What it says in the title. It's over and in an attempt to process Trump's shock victory we break down the 2016 election into historical perspective. To do so, we're joined once more by Paddy Andelic (@pkandelic). We discuss why Trump won, why Clinton lost, where the parties stand, and what history suggests we're in store for from a Trump presidency. Finally, we answer an eerily prescient listener question. We'll be back next week with our regular podcast so look out for that, and thanks again for listening.   Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On Episode 30 of American History Too! we take a deep dive into the history of music and presidential campaigns in the United States. Joined by the Imperial War Museum's Fraser McCallum we discuss the rise of campaign music from the nineteenth century to the current 2016 election, including all the great love affairs and spats that have existed between politicians and musicians.  Following our discussion of music, we then delve into a debate on whether the politics as entertainment - a theme so evident in this year's campaign - is a new phenomenon or whether it's been around since the beginning of mass democracy.   We'll be back next month with a podcast on the history of the CIA. Until then, have a great election! Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In London on May 22nd 1846, the great anti-slavery campaigner and orator Frederick Douglass - who himself was a former slave – stood before a large audience and related to them the reasons why he was there:  “Why do I not confine my efforts to the United States? My answer first, that slavery is the common enemy of mankind and it should be made acquainted with its abominable character. Slavery is a system of wrong, so blinding to all around, so hardening to the heart, so corrupting to the morals, so deleterious to religion, so sapping to all the principles of justice, in its immediate vicinity, that the community surrounding it lacks the moral stamina necessary to its removal. It is a system of such gigantic evils, so strong, so overwhelming in its power, that no one nation is equal to its removal. I want the slaveholder surrounded, by a wall of anti-slavery fire, so that he may see the condemnation of himself and his system glaring down in letters of light. I want him to feel that he has no sympathy in England, Scotland, and Ireland, that he has none in Canada, none in Mexico, none among the poor wild Indians…” On this episode of American History Too! we're joined by University College London's Matt Griffin (@mattrgriffin) to explore the fascinating who, what, and why of trans-Atlantic anti-slavery campaigns in the mid-nineteenth century. Cheers, Mark Malcolm Reading List R. J. M. Blackett, Building an Antislavery Wall: Black Americans in the Atlantic Abolitionist Movement, 1830-1860 (Baton Rouge: Louisiana University Press, 1983) David Brion Davis, ‘Looking at Slavery from Broader Perspectives’, The American Historical Review 105:2 (Apr., 2000), 452-466 Don H. Doyle, The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War (New York: Basic Books, 2015) Amanda Foreman, World on Fire: Britain’s Crucial Role in the American Civil War (London: Penguin, 2011) Van Gosse, ‘“As a Nation, the English Are Our Friends": The Emergence of African American Politics in the British Atlantic World, 1772-1861’, The American Historical Review 113:4 (Oct., 2008), 1003-1028 Caleb McDaniel, The Problem of Democracy in the Age of Slavery: Garrisonian Abolitionists and Transatlantic Reform (Baton Rouge: Louisiana University Press, 2013) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In 1921, the influential magazine Literary Digest speculated on the morality and nature of the modern young woman: Is the “old fashioned girl”, with all that she stands for in sweetness, modesty, and innocence, in danger of becoming extinct? Or was she really no better nor worse than the “up to date” girl, who in turn will become the “old fashioned girl” to a later generation? Is it even possible as a small, but impressive, minority would have us believe that the girl of today has certain new virtues of “frankness, sincerity, seriousness of purpose”, lives on a “higher level of morality” and is on the whole “more clean minded and clean lived” than her predecessors? The Roaring Twenties in America are – in popular culture at least – seen as the era of the liberated flapper, Daisy Buchanan, and all night jazz. But is this really an accurate portrayal of womanhood, femininity, and beauty in the decade of “return to normalcy”? Today on American History Too!, we’re joined by the University of Strathclyde's Rachael Alexander to discuss how femininity and beauty were perceived in 1920s America, and what role mass-market women’s magazines had in reinforcing and changing stereotypes. Thanks, as always, for listening! Cheers, Mark MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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With the Republican convention in Cleveland complete, all eyes turn now to Philadelphia where the Democrats will gather to nominate the first ever woman to head a major party ticket in US history.  Joined once more by the University of Oxford's Paddy Andelic (@pkandelic) we take a deep dive into the recent history of the Democratic party and travel the road to Hillary Clinton. Beginning amid the chaos of the 1968 convention in Chicago, we talk through Humphrey, McGovern, Watergate Babies, Carter, Ted Kennedy, Tip O'Neill, Bill Clinton, and Barack Obama.   Thanks again for listening. Next month we'll be back turning our focus to cultural history, but look out for an election special before November! Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Still baffled by Donald Trump's nomination? Be perplexed no more! With the Republican party heading to their convention in Cleveland to nominate the billionaire tycoon, we're joined by the University of Oxford's Paddy Andelic (@pkandelic) to discuss the Republicans over the past half century as we look to map out the road to Trump. On our travels we cover Barry Goldwater, Civil Rights, Richard Nixon, Watergate, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and both Bush I II. We also delve into some of the issues and causes that have defined the GOP since the 1960s.  All this, and much more, on another bumper podcast of American History Too! We'll be back soon with a podcast covering the Road to Hillary Clinton! Cheers, Mark and MalcolmLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In 1936, not long after German heavyweight boxer Max Schmeling knocked out his African-American opponent, Joe Louis, the journal Der Weltkampf published the following statement: “These countries cannot thank Schmeling enough for this victory for he checked the arrogance of the Negro race and clearly demonstrated to them the superiority of white intelli- gence. He restored the prestige of the white race and in doing so accomplished a cultural achievement. I for one am convinced that Schmeling was fully conscious of this fact and that he fought as a representative of the white race.... The victory of Italy in Abyssinia must be regarded in the same light.... After the war started there was only one thing left, the fight of a white against a black nation. This has become a racial fight. The same question must be asked: What would have happened if Abyssinia had won? The same answer applies: the whole black world would have risen up against the white race in arrogance and bestial cruelty.” Were these horrific attitudes towards a man whom many experts regard as the greatest heavyweight boxer of all time confined to Nazi Germany? Or did his own countrymen view the great Joe Louis as inferior, unworthy of the status of a great champion? And what of other great athletes such as Jesse Owens? How did white America react? In order to answer these and other questions, today on American history too, we’ll be exploring the complex, convoluted, and at often appalling history of race and sport in inter-war America. Scholarship In Black and White: The Untold Story of Joe Louis and Jesse Owens - Donald McRae The Fight of the Century: Jack Johnson, Joe Louis, and the Struggle for Racial Equality - Thomas R. Hietala Ring of Hate: The Brown Bomber and Hitler's Hero - Joe Louis, Max Schmeling and the Bitter Propaganda War - Patrick Myler  Beyond Glory: Max Schmeling vs Joe Louis and a World on the Brink - David Margolick Joe Louis: Hard Times Man - Randy Roberts Papa Jack: Jack Johnson and the Era of White Hopes - Randy Roberts Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson - Geoffrey C. Ward A Flame of Pure Fire: Jack Dempsey and the Roaring Twenties - Roger Kahn Nazi Games: The Olympics of 1936 - David Clay Large Hitler's Olympics: The 1936 Berlin Olympic Games - Christopher Hilton Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series - Eliot Asinof The Big Bam: The Life and Times of Babe Ruth - Leigh Montville Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On January 20th 1920, the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution - which banned the production, transport, and sale of alcohol - went into effect. Among the many Americans rejoicing at the passage of Prohibition that evening, was one Pauline Sabin.  Sabin, a wealthy WASP socialite, who was New York’s first ever female member of the Republican National Committee, foresaw many positives to an alcohol-free society. Like many American women, Sabin viewed alcohol as a threat to the morality of her family, particularly her two young sons, and, in her own words, Sabin believed that “a world without liquor would be a beautiful world.” Quickly, however, Sabin and many others realised that such utopian hopes were misplaced. Prohibition, it seemed was creating more problems than it solved. Looking around at the increased crime and disrespect for law and order in the country, Sabin came to the conclusion that Prohibition was actually creating a worse world for her sons as opposed to the beautiful world she had once imagined.  By 1929, convinced of Prohibition’s failure, Pauline Sabin formed and led the Women’s Organization for National Prohibition Reform (WONPR). An organisation that quickly accrued over 1.5 million members and led the charge to repeal Prohibition.  Women had played a crucial role in Prohibition’s passage and much to everyone’s surprise they would play an equally important role in its eventual repeal in 1933.   Prohibition would throw up many such surprises throughout the thirteen years it remained on the books and many of its failures still hold important lessons for our society today.  As such, on this episode of American History Too, we aim to answer a simple question:  Why did American Prohibition fail? Reading List David Kennedy, Freedom From Fear (1999) David E. Kyvig, “Women Against Prohibition,” American Quarterly, Vol. 28, No. 4 (Autumn, 1976), 465-482. Mary Murphy, “Bootlegging Mothers and Drinking Daughters: Gender and Prohibition in Butte, Montana,” American Quarterly, Vol.46, No.2 (Jun., 1994), 174-194. Michael Parrish, Anxious Decades (1992) Kenneth Rose, American women and the repeal of Prohibition (1996) Wendy Sarvasy, “Beyond the Difference versus Equality Policy Debate: Postsuffrage Feminism, Citizenship, and the Quest for a Feminist Welfare State,” Signs, 17:2 (Winter, 1992), 329-362 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In early 1943 – while the Battle of Stalingrad raged thousands of miles away – US government officials explored the hotel room of a recently deceased scientist. They were looking for the plans to a weapon that could change the war. They were looking for a death ray. The death ray did not exist, but there was enough doubt that Federal officials thought it wise to assess the thousands of notes and sketches that had been made during the scientist’s lifetime. After their assessment, the notes were locked away, leading to a persistent conspiracy theory that there had been a death ray, and that the US government was covering it all up. The notes had belonged to a man who in many ways embodied the American dream, the golden age of science, and the modern image of eccentric inventor. He had been one of the most famous men not only in America, but in the world. He laid the groundwork for many of the technologies that we take for granted today and contributed to many more. In the decades that followed his death in a room of the Hotel New Yorker on January 7, 1943, the scientist has gone from virtual obscurity to international celebrity, the namesake of high powered electric sportscars and a major international airport. Today on American History Too!, we explore the life, times, and legacy of the man who supposedly invented the electrical age: Nikola Tesla. Reading W. Bernard Carlson, Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013) Robert Lomas, The man who invented the twentieth century: Nikola Tesla, forgotten genius of electricity (London: Headline, 2000) Paul Lucier, ‘The Origins of Pure and Applied Science in Gilded Age America’, Isis, 103:3 (September 2012), 527-536 Marc J. Seifer, Wizard : The life and times of Nikola Tesla ; biography of a genius (Secaucus: Carol Pub., 1996)Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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‘On the 25th of September 1984, in one of the hardest-hitting speeches of his long Presidential campaign against Ronald Reagan, former Vice-President Walter F. Mondale spoke powerfully at George Washington University about the contemporary political landscape: This election is not about jellybeans and pens pals. It is about toxic dumps that give cancer to our children. This election is not about country music and birthday cakes. It is about old people who can’t pay for medicine. This election is not about the Olympic torch. It is about the civil-rights laws that opened athletics to women and minorities who won those gold medals… This election is not about my standing in the polls. It is about my stand against the illegal war in Nicaragua. This election is not about slogans, like “standing tall.” It is about specifics, like the nuclear freeze – because if those weapons go off, no one will be left standing tall. This election is about values. I refuse to cut loose from my history and desert the beliefs I have always fought for. I would rather lose a race about decency than win one about self-interest. Despite his best efforts, he did lose. The country, according to Mondale, was getting another four years of jellybeans and cowboy boots.’ So, today on American History Too!, we’ll be discussing the complex and often contested intersections between liberalism and conservatism in Ronald Reagan’s America. Reading List Doug Rossinow, The Reagan Era (2015) Randall Rothenberg, The Neoliberals (1984) Bradford Martin, The Other Eighties (2011) Kenneth Baer, Reinventing Democrats (2000) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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It was a midterm election year, the economy was beginning tolook a bit shaky again, and the Democrats were in danger of losing their majoritiesin Congress. The Democratic President, gathering his congressional troopsin the White House to rally them ahead of a tough campaign, knew just the rightnote to strike.  He acknowledged that the economy was a problem, but thePresident reminded his fellow Democrats that whatever happened their partywould never let the economic burden fall upon the American people as HerbertHoover had during the Great Depression. The President in question was not Hoover’s successor,Franklin Roosevelt, nor was it Harry Truman or even John F. Kennedy.  ThePresident was Lyndon Johnson, the year was 1966 and Herbert Hoover, had, bynow, been out of office for 33 long years. Hoover, who had been known as the Great Humanitarian beforehe assumed the office of the presidency in the 1929, was, for the rest of hislife, the symbol of an uncaring and aloof government, and the noose around theRepublican party’s electoral chances for over three decades. Historians, most of whom lived through the Great Depressionand admired FDR’s New Deal initially played a key role in making sure that thisnegative image of Hoover stuck, but since his death in 1964, America’s firstQuaker President has gone through a reassessment that has attempted torehabilitate Hoover in the eyes of the American people.   Today on American History Too! we ask the simplequestion, does Hoover deserve this reassessment, or does he deserve to beremembered as one of the worst presidents to ever occupy 1600 PennsylvaniaAvenue?  To help us with this task, we're joined once again by the University of Edinburgh's Alastair Duthie (@d_alastair) We also discuss our favourite and least favourite campaign slogans - thanks to Dafydd Townley for the question!  Cheers again for listening, Mark and Malcolm Reading List -       Faushold, Martin L. The Presidency ofHerbert Hoover (Lawrence, Kans.: University Press of Kansas, 1985) -       Jeansonne, Glen, The Life of Herbert Hoover: Fighting Quaker, 1928-1933 (NewYork:  Palgrave MacMillan, 2012) -       Hoover, Herbert. The Memoirs of HerbertHoover. 3 vols. (New York: Macmillan Co., 1951) -       Kennedy, David, Freedom from Fear (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999) -       Leuchtenburg, William E. The Perils ofProsperity, 1914-1932. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958) -       Rauchway, Eric, The Great Depression and New Deal: A very short introduction (New York: Oxofrd University Press, 2008) -       Wilson, Joan Hoff. Herbert Hoover:Forgotten Progressive, (Boston:Little, Brown Co., 1975) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Is there a ‘Special Relationship’ between the United States and the United Kingdom?  And, if there is, what actually is ‘special’ about it?  Those are the two questions we seek to answer on this month’s American History Too!.  Tune in for a guided tour of the ups and the downs of the US-UK relationship over the past 200 years – particularly during the post-World War II era – and come to your own conclusion on this fascinating topic.    New Year, New Format - we also introduce an opening question to the podcast! This week: If you could have dinner with three figures in American History who would they be?  We have our answers, but we are more interested in yours! Let us know at @ahtoopodcast or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/americanhistorytoo We’ll be back next month to discuss tumultuous presidency of Herbert Hoover with Alastair Duthie.  Cheers, Mark and Malcolm   Reading List Aldrich, Richard J., ‘British intelligence and the Anglo-American “Special relationship” during the Cold War’, Review of International Studies, 24:3 (Jul.,1998), 331-351 Ashton, Nigel, ‘Harold Macmillan and the “Golden Days” of Anglo-American Relations Revisited, 1957–63’, Diplomatic History, 29:4 (September 2005), 691-723. Cooper, James, Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan: A Very Political Special Relationship (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), Danchev, Alex, ‘The Cold War “Special Relationship” Revisited’, Diplomacy and Statecraft, 17:3 (2006), 579-595 Dobson, Alan and Steve Marsh, ‘Anglo-American Relations: End of a Special Relationship?’, The International History Review, 36:4 (2014), 673-697 Dumbrell, John, A Special Relationship: Anglo-American Relations from the Cold War to Iraq, 2nd Edition (Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, 2006) Jeffreys-Jones, Rhodri, In Spies We Trust: The Story of Western Intelligence (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013)  Jeffreys-Jones, Rhodri, ‘The End of an Exclusive Special Intelligence Relationship: British-American Intelligence Co-operation Before, During and After the 1960s’, Intelligence and National Security, 27:5 (2012), 707-721 Khalil, Osamah F., ‘The Crossroads of the World: U.S. and British Foreign Policy Doctrines and the Construct of the Middle East, 1902–2007’, Diplomatic History, 38:2 (Feb., 2014)  McGarr, Paul M., The Cold War in South Asia: Britain, the United States, and the Indian Subcontinent, 1945-1965 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), Ovendale, Ritchie, Anglo-American Relations in the Twentieth Century (Basingstoke: MacMillan, 1998) Parr, Helen, ‘Britain, America, East of Suez and the EEC: Finding a Role in British Foreign Policy, 1964–67’, Contemporary British History, 20:3 (2006), 403-421. Rossbach, Niklas H., Heath, Nixon and the Rebirth of the Special Relationship: Britain, the US and the EC, 1969-74 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), Ruane, Kevin and James Ellison, ‘Managing the Americans: Anthony Eden, Harold Macmillan and the Pursuit of Power-by-Proxy in the 1950s’, Contemporary British History, 18:3 (Autumn 2004), 147-167 Svendsen, Adam D.M., Intelligence Cooperation and the War on Terror: Anglo-American Security Relations after 9/11 (Abingdon: Routledge, 2010) Tate, Simon, A Special Relationship?: British Foreign Policy in the Era of American Hegemony (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2012)   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On December 21, 1970, a man dressed in black and wearing sunglasses entered the Oval Office of the White House. He desperately wanted to bring a Colt .45 pistol with him, but even without it, his purpose was clear. In front of him stood a craggy, slightly crumpled figure. The man in black advanced, but his intent was not assassination. He had come seeking a badge. A badge that he thought would give him power. The man he met had worked all of his life to gain power, and now that he had it, he would do everything he could to hold on to it. This was one of the most bizarre meetings ever to take place in the White House, for the man in black was the King of Rock n’ Roll, Elvis Presley and the craggy, crumpled man was President Richard M. Nixon. The photographs of that meeting are some of the most requested images from the US National Archives, but by the end of the 1970s, Elvis would be dead and Nixon would have resigned in disgrace. Yet, the event has gained the status of a modern myth and helps to illustrate the interconnectedness of power, politics, and popular culture. So, on Episode 19 of American History Too, we explore the fascinating, bizarre, and sometimes sad story of the meeting between the President and the King.   Reading/Viewing List Irwin F. Gellman, The President and the Apprentice: Eisenhower and Nixon, 1952-1961 (Yale University Press, 2015) Iwan Morgan, Nixon (Arnold: 2002) This is Elvis (documentary, 1981) National Security Archive: http://nsarchive.gwu.edu/nsa/elvis/elnix.html Douglas Brode, Elvis: Cinema and popular culture (London: McFarland, 2006) Peter Carlson, 'When Elvis Met Nixon', The Smithsonian Magazine, December 2010, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/ist/?next=/history/when-elvis-met-nixon-69892425/ Peter Guralnik, Last Train to Memphis: The Rise of Elvis Presley (London, Boston: Little, Brown, 1994) Glen Jeansonne, David Luhrssen, and Dan Sokolovie, Elvis Presley, Reluctant Rebel: His Life and Our Times (Santa Barbara: Praeger, 2011)   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Ever thought that the United States is a more violent country than other ‘Western’ nations?  And, if so, have you ever wondered why?   On Episode 18 of American History Too! we are joined by the University of Edinburgh’s Rian Sutton (@riansutton) to discuss America’s more violent nature by looking at what one historian terms its ‘homicide problem’ (n.b. it’s more complicated than guns and cowboys!).  The reasons for the US’s higher murder rate than Europe since the mid-nineteenth century remain disputed and Rian, discussing her research on women and murder, illuminates this ongoing debate. Rian also outlines how women have murdered in the US, why some women have escaped prosecution despite damning evidence, and how the public have often reacted to such crimes.    Finally, if you want to hear a whole lot of grizzly anecdotes – mostly featuring a woman wielding an axe – then this is the podcast for you! -- We hope you enjoy this podcast and we’ll be back next month with our next episode on ‘The President and The King’ Cheers, Mark and Malcolm @ahtoopodcast  Reading: Britton, Dana M. ‘Feminism in Criminology: Engendering the Outlaw.’ American Academy of Political and Social Science 571, no. Sept (2000): 57-76. D'Cruze, Shani, Sandra Walklate, and Samantha Pegg. Murder: Social and Historical Approaches to Understanding Murder and Murderers.  London: Routledge, 2011. Filetti, Jean S. ‘From Lizzie Borden to Loren Bobitt: Violent Women and Gendered Justice.’ Journal of American Studies 35, no. 3 (2001): 471-484.   Halttunen, Karen. Murder Most Foul:  The Killer and the American Gothic Imagination.  London: Harvard University Press, 1998. Lane, Roger. Murder in America:  A History.  Columbus: The Ohio University Press, 1997. Lane, Roger. ‘Murder in America: A Historian’s Perspective.’ Crime and Justice 25, (1999): 191-224 Linders, Annulla, and Alana Van Gundy-Yoder. ‘Gall, Gallantry, and the Gallows:  Capital Punishment and the Social Construction of Gender, 1840-1920.’ Gender and Society 22, no. 3 (2008): 324-48. Monkkonen, Eric H. Murder in New York City.  London: University of California Press, 2001. Monkkonen, Eric H. ‘AHR Forum: Homicide: Explaining America’s Exceptionalism.’ American Historical Review 111, (2006): 76-94. Roth, Randolph. American Homicide.  Harvard: Harvard University Press, 2009 Shipman, Marlin. The Penalty Is Death:  U.S. Newspaper Coverage of Women's Executions.  London: University of Missouri Press, 2002. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In the small town of Dayton, Tennessee, the morning of Friday July 10, 1925 was blisteringly hot. Outside the country courtroom, a crowd of around 1000 people had gathered. Squeezing through the throng came a young schoolteacher and athletics coach, John Scopes. Scopes was accompanied by Clarence Darrow, one of the most famous lawyers in the United States. But when a cheer went up from the assembled mass, it was not for Scopes or Darrow, but for the elderly, burly figure of Williams Jennings Bryan. Lawyer, moralist, three times Presidential candidate, religious authority, and key figure in the Populist movement of the 1890s. These two legal titans were here to defend and prosecute John Scopes. His crime was admitting to teaching Darwinian evolution in defiance of a state law banning the promulgation of evolutionary theory.  The Scopes Trial has entered popular myth and legend, claimed as a victory by both sides, misrepresented and misunderstood in film and literature. So, in Episode 17 of American History Too! we’re going to look at the 1925 Scopes Trial and try to get to the heart of what was actually going on. Reading List Barry Hankins, Jesus and Gin:  Evangelicalism, the Roaring Twenties and Today’s Culture Wars (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) Edward J. Larson, Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America’s Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion (Harvard University Press, 1998) Michael Lienisch, In the Beginning: Fundamentalism, the Scopes Trial, and the Making of the Antievolution Movement (University of North Carolina Press, 2007) Jeffrey P. Moran, The Scopes Trial: A Brief History With Documents (Bedford/St Martin’s, 2002) Ronald Numbers, Darwinism Comes to America (Harvard University Press, 1998) Charles Postel, The Populist Vision (Oxford University Press, 2007) Andrew Preston, Sword of the Spirit, Shield of Faith: Religion in American War and Diplomacy (Anchor Books, 2012) Adam Shapiro, Trying Biology: The Scopes Trial, Textbooks, and the Antievolution Movement in American Schools (University of Chicago Press, 2014) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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American History Too! is back for a new semester and we’re examining the Irish-American experience of the Civil War (1861-1865).  To help us delve into this vast and interesting topic is the University of Edinburgh’s Catherine Bateson.  Cat guides us through Irish immigration to North America, the different military and civilian roles played by Irish-Americans during the war, and some of the music that emerged from the Irish-American experience of the young nation’s most brutal conflict. We hope you enjoy this episode as much as we enjoyed listening to Cat while recording it.  Thanks again to all of our listeners; we are humbled to be nearing the 10,000 listens landmark in our first year of podcasting. As always if you have any questions or feedback then please get in touch at @ahtoopodcast or ahtoo@outlook.com  We’ll be back next month to discuss the fascinating Scopes trial of the 1920s. Cheers, Mark and Malcolm Reading List David T. Gleeson, The Green and the Gray: The Irish in the Confederate States of America (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2013) Christian G. Samito, Becoming American Under Fire: Irish Americans, African Americans, and the Politics of Citizenship During the Civil War Era (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009). Damian Shiels, The Irish in the American Civil War (Dublin: The History Press Ireland, 2013) Christian McWhirter, Battle Hymns: The Power and Popularity of Music in the Civil War (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012) Kerby A. Miller, Ireland and Irish America: Culture, Class, and Transatlantic Migration (Dublin: Field Day, 2008) Paul Quigley, Shifting Grounds: Nationalism and the American South, 1848-1865 (New York: OUP, 2012) Susannah J. Ural, The Harp and the Eagle: Irish-American Volunteers and the Union Army, 1861-1865 (New York: New York University Press, 2006) Susannah J. Ural, (ed.), Civil War Citizens: Race, Ethnicity, and Identity in America’s Bloodiest Conflict (New York: New York University Press, 2010) Irish in the American Civil War: Exploring Irish Involvement in the American Civil War, http://irishamericancivilwar.com/ Britain and the American Civil War, British Library online gallery exhibition, http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/uscivilwar/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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We’re back with the second part of our discussion of President Jimmy Carter and his times.  On this episode we cast our eye beyond the United States and discuss the tumultuous foreign events that took place during the late 1970s in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.  Why is Jimmy Carter, a president who brokered a historic peace agreement between Israel and Egypt, remembered as a weak leader who presided over American decline on the world stage?  We wrap up with a discussion of Carter’s post-presidency and ask, is he the greatest of all the post-presidents?  Also, we should note that we recorded this podcast before the sad news that Jimmy Carter has been diagnosed with cancer. Thanks again for listening, Mark and Malcolm @ahtoopodcast   Reading for both podcasts 15a and 15b: Jimmy Carter, White House diary (New York:  Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010) Andrew Scott Cooper, The Oil Kings: How the U.S., Iran, and Saudi Arabia changed the balance of power in the Middle East (Oxford:  Oneworld Publications, 2011) Kenneth Earl Morris, Jimmy Carter:  American moralist (Athens, GA:  University of Georgia Press, 1996) Scott Kaufman, Plans Unraveled: The Foreign Policy of the Carter Administration (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2008) Dominic Sandbrook, Mad as Hell: the crisis of the 1970s and the rise of the populist Right (New York: A.A. Knopf, 2011) ‘Jimmy Carter’, PBS American Experience (2002) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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History’s greatest monster’ or an underrated and admirable president?  We’re back and we’re discussing President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981) and his times.  Such are the amount of topics that we need to cover that the podcast will be split into two, with this month’s release dealing primarily with the domestic issues of late 1970s. Welcome to a land of self-doubt, oil shocks, and a tanking economy, where the issues that would define the ‘culture wars’ for the next four decades were taking shape.  Presiding over it all is the Democratic President James Earl Carter, a born-again Christian from Plains, Georgia who has promised to never lie to the American people.  Was Carter’s presidency consigned to failure by events beyond his control or was the ‘American moralist’ responsible for his own downfall?  Hopefully, by the end of the two podcasts you’ll be able to form your own opinion! Thanks again for listening, Mark and Malcolm @ahtoopodcast Reading for both podcasts 15a and 15b: Jimmy Carter, White House diary (New York:  Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010) Andrew Scott Cooper, The Oil Kings: How the U.S., Iran, and Saudi Arabia changed the balance of power in the Middle East (Oxford:  Oneworld Publications, 2011) Kenneth Earl Morris, Jimmy Carter:  American moralist (Athens, GA:  University of Georgia Press, 1996) Scott Kaufman, Plans Unraveled: The Foreign Policy of the Carter Administration (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2008) Dominic Sandbrook, Mad as Hell: the crisis of the 1970s and the rise of the populist Right (New York: A.A. Knopf, 2011) ‘Jimmy Carter’, PBS American Experience (2002) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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We return for the fourteenth episode of American History Too! to discuss a horrifying and shameful period in US history:  the outbreak and response to the HIV/AIDS crisis during the 1980s.  Academic impartiality is at a premium as we delve into social and cultural reasons behind the US government’s failure to tame the spread of the deadly virus.  We also consider the important cultural touchstones that HIV/AIDS inspired and also the evolution of gay rights in the US. For those interested, the British broadcast about AIDS that begins the show can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SqRNUUOk7s  The broadcast stood in stark contrast to official US silence on the issue. We’ll be back in a couple of weeks to start our series entitled ‘The Revolutionary Sixties?’ Thanks again for listening, Mark Malcolm                  Contact at @ahtoopodast or ahtoo@outlook.com Reading List Jennifer Brier, ‘“Save Our Kids, Keep AIDS Out”: Anti-AIDS Activism and the Legacy of Community Control in Queens, New York’, Journal of Social History, 39:4 (Summer, 2006), 965-987 Elizabeth Fee and Nancy Krieger, ‘The Emerging Histories of AIDS: Three Successive Paradigms’, History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences, 15:3 (1993), 459-487 Randy Shilts, And the band played on:  politics, people, and the AIDS epidemic (New York:  Penguin, 1987) Films and Documentaries And the Band Played On , HBO film based on Randy Shilts book (1993) Dir. Jonathan Demme, Philadelphia (1993) Angels in America, HBO miniseries (2003) ‘The Age of Aids,’ PBS Frontline (2006) – numerous interviews available on website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On the thirteenth episode of American History Too! we embark on our very first sequel – picking up where episode six left off in our discussion of Nuclear Fallout. Why did one researcher collect thousands of baby teeth and why are her results quite terrifying?  When and where did the US almost nuke its own citizens – and how was disaster averted?  Were fallout shelters a genuine attempt to help the population in the event of nuclear warfare or were they merely ‘for show’?  Our resident nuclear aficionado has all the answers.   Finally, how was nuclear fallout represented in film and literature during the 1950s and 1960s?  We explore On the Beach, Dr Stangelove, and why the British government chose to censor Peter Watkins’ The War Game (1965) which depicted the impact of nuclear warfare on Great Britain.  And always remember, ye cannae spend a dollar when your deid! We’ll be back in a fortnight with a discussion of the contentious decade that was the 1980s.  Cheers, Mark and Malcolm Reading List Brown, JoAnne, ‘”A Is for Atom, B is For Bomb”: Civil Defense in American Public Education, 1948-1963,’ The Journal of American History, 75:1 (June, 1988), 68-90 Chapman, James, ‘The BBC and the Censorship of The War Game (1965),’
Journal of Contemporary History, 41:1 (January, 2006), 75-94 __________‘"The War Game" Controversy—Again,’
Journal of Contemporary History, 43:1 (January, 2008), 105-112 Cordle, Daniel, ‘Beyond the apocalypse of closure: nuclear anxiety in the postmodern literature of the United States,’ in Andrew Hammond (ed.), Cold War Literature: Writing the Global Conflict (Abingdon, 2006) Davis, Tracy C., Stages of Emergency: Cold War Nuclear Civil Defense (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2007)                                                               Rosi, Eugene J., ‘Mass and Attentive Opinion on Nuclear Weapons Test and Fallout, 1954-1963’, The Public Opinion Quarterly, 29:2 (Summer, 1965), 280-297 Shaw, Tony, ‘The BBC, the State and Cold War Culture: The Case of Television's The War Game (1965),’ The English Historical Review, 121:494 (December, 2006), 1351-1384 Wayne, Mike, ‘Failing the Public: The BBC, The War Game and Revisionist History, A Reply to James Chapman,’
Journal of Contemporary History, 42:4 (October, 2007), 627-637 Weart, Spencer, Nuclear Fear: A History of Images (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988) Winkler, Allan M., Life Under A Cloud: American Anxiety About the Atom (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1993) Wittner, Lawrence S., The Struggle Against the Bomb, Vol.2: Resisting the Bomb: A history of the world nuclear disarmament movement, 1954–1970 (Stanford CA: Stanford University Press, 1997) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On the twelfth podcast of American History Too! we wade through the quagmire of the Vietnam War.  In discussing arguably the first war that the United States ever lost, we consider the divisions the war created at home and how Vietnam Veterans were treated by the general public. We also chat extensively about the Kent State Shootings - 'the most popular murders ever committed in the United States' - and the backlash to the antiwar movement. Find out why the US was in Vietnam, why Great Britain never joined the coalition fighting in Vietnam, and Malcolm explains why the massive hit movie Aliens is in fact a film about the war in Southeast Asia! All this and much, much more on this week’s bumper length American History Too! Cheers, Mark and Malcolm Reading and Viewing List -          Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, Peace now!: American society and the ending of the Vietnam War (1999) -          Stewart O’Nan, The Vietnam Reader: The Definitive Collection of Fiction and Nonfiction on the War (1998) -          Platoon (1986) -          Born on the Fourth of July (1989) -          Coming Home (1978) -          Apocalypse Now (1979) -          Aliens (1986) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On episode eleven of American History Too! we delve into one of the most chilling moments in US history – the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22nd, 1963.  To aid us in the voyage through fear, conspiracy, and legend we are joined by the University of Glasgow’s Fraser McCallum.   What is uncontested about that day? What are the most plausible and most outlandish conspiracy theories to prosper in the fifty years since the assassination?  Why do these conspiracies matter?  And how were Lyndon Johnson and Bobby Kennedy the original conspiracy theorists?  Finally, does the myth of the fallen President match the reality of the Kennedy presidency?  Find out all this and more on this episode of American History Too! We’ll be back with our next podcast on the Vietnam War in the next two weeks. Cheers, Mark and Malcolm   Reading/Viewing List -          Kathryn Olmsted, Real Enemies: Conspiracy Theories and American Democracy, World War 1 to 9/11(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009) -          William Manchester, The Death of a President: November 20–November 25, 1963 (US:  Harper Row, 2013) -          (Film) - Dir. Oliver Stone, JFK (1991)  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On episode 10 of American History Too! we arrive at the tumultuous 1960s.  To help us better understand this controversial decade, Malcolm assumes host duties as Mark guides us through the presidency of Lyndon Johnson and his ambitious search for the ‘Great Society’.  What did Johnson mean by a ‘Great Society’?  What did he achieve?  And why did he leave the presidency as a ‘broken and dispirited’ figure?  And what in the world does a bill about rat extermination have to do with all of this?    Serious academic rigour aside, we engage in a discussion about the tallest and shortest presidents, Mark (briefly and horribly) attempts a Southern accent, while Malcolm marvels in the historical amnesia of ‘Guns or Butter’ advocates. Finally, we depart to the dulcet tones of one-hit wonder and apparent crystal ball owner, Barry McGuire, wand his eerily accurate 1965 song, ‘Eve of Destruction’.  Thanks again for listening and we’ll be back soon with a discussion of the JFK assassination. Cheers, Mark and Malcolm Reading List Andrew, John A., Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society (Chicago : Ivan R. Dee, 1998) Bernstein, Irving, Guns or Butter:  The Presidency of Lyndon Johnson, (Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 1996) Converse, Phillip, Clausen, Aage R., Miller, Warren E., ‘Electoral Myth and Reality: The 1964 Election,’ The American Political Science Review, Vol. 59, No. 2 (June 1965) http://www.jstor.org/stable/1953052 Dallek, Matthew, The right moment:  Ronald Reagan’s first victory and the decisive turning point in American politics (New York: Simon Schuster, 2000)                    Dallek, Robert, Flawed Giant:  Lyndon Johnson and His Times 1961-73 (Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 1998) Davies, Gareth, From opportunity to entitlement : the transformation and decline of Great Society liberalism (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas 1996) Johnson, Robert David, All the way with LBJ: the 1964 presidential election (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009) Patterson, James T., The Eve of Destruction: how 1965 Transformed America, (New York: Basic Books, 2012) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On episode nine of American History Too! we turn our attention to a period in American history that has become indelibly linked to one man: the Second Red Scare and Senator Joseph McCarthy. But is McCarthy the be all and end all of anti-communism? What influence did he really have?  And were there other figures in the United States who played more prominent and important roles in creating what the historian David Caute called ‘the great fear’?  Is ‘Hooverism’ – or even ‘Nixonism’ – a better name to understand this period? We take you through a tour of the interesting, and often distasteful, figures that the Second Red Scare brought to prominence.  We also discuss the parallel rise of the  so-called ‘Lavender Scare’ which saw gay Americans targeted – on some occasions more aggressively – than suspected communists.  Stay tuned until the very end when you’ll be treated to a Cold War “anthem” from Carson Robison! We will back in two weeks to discuss Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society. Cheers, Mark and Malcolm Reading -          Richard Hofstadter, The Paranoid Style in American Politics (first published 1964) -          Kyle A. Cuordileone, ‘"Politics in an Age of Anxiety": Cold War Political Culture and the Crisis in American Masculinity, 1949-1960,’ Journal of American History, 87:2 (Sep., 2000), 515-545 -          Jennifer Delton, “Rethinking Post-World War II Anticommunism,” The Journal of the Historical Society (March, 2010), 1-41 -          David K. Johnson, The Lavender Scare: The Cold War Persecution of Gays and Lesbians in the Federal Government (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2004)- -          Kathryn Olmsted, Real Enemies: Conspiracy Theories and American Democracy, World War 1 to 9/11 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009) -          Nelson W. Polsby, “Towards an Explanation of McCarthyism,” Political Studies 8 (1960), 250-271- -          Ellen Schrecker, “McCarthyism: Political Repression and the Fear of Communism,” Social Research 71. (2004),1041-1086. -          Gregg Marshall, Tricky Dick and the Pink Lady: Richard Nixon vs. Helen Gahagan Douglas--Sexual Politics and the Red Scare, 1950 (New York: Random House, 1998) Chp.1 - http://www.nytimes.com/books/first/m/mitchell-tricky.html Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On the eighth episode of American History Too! we delve into one of the great crisis moments in American History – the Great Depression.  We’re joined by special guest, Alastair Duthie (@d_alastair), who helps guide us through the historiographical minefield that surrounds Presidents’ Herbert Hoover and Franklin Roosevelt in their attempts to bring the American economy and people back from the brink.  We begin by explaining some of the reasons for the global financial collapse of the 1920s and 1930s.  Malcolm inspires his own great depression as he dips his toe into the cold waters of economic history, Alastair reminds us that the 1920s was not all it has been cracked up to be, and Mark wholeheartedly refuses to ever discuss the t*riff.  Also, it is decided that perhaps the much maligned Herbert Hoover was not the twentieth century’s James Buchanan (more of a Franklin Pierce, perhaps). The second half of the podcast is devoted to a consideration of Roosevelt’s New Deal and the surrounding historiography – what was the New Deal trying to achieve?  What is its legacy?  And how have the political leanings of historians continued to influence the New Deal debate?  Finally, after all the doom and gloom of the Great Depression we end the podcast on the more optimistic note of Happy Days Are Here Again. Thanks again for listening and we will back in two weeks to discuss the Red Scare of the 1940s and 1950s! Cheers, Mark and Malcolm   Reading List -          Brian E. Birdnow, “Hoover Biographies and Hoover Revisionism”, in Katherine Sibly (ed.), A Companion to Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover (Chichester: John Wiley Sons, 2014) -          James MacGregor Burns, Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox (New York, NY: Harcourt Brace, 1956) -          William E. Leuchtenburg, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal (New York, NY: Harper Row, 1963) -          Eric Rauchway, ‘New Deal Denialism’, Dissent (Winter, 2010), 66-72 -          Amity Schlaes, The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression (New York, NY: HarperCollins, 2007) -          Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., The Age of Roosevelt, 3 vols. (Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, 1957-60) -          Morton Keller, “The New Deal: A New Look,” Polity 31 (1999), 657-663 -          David M. Kennedy, ‘What the New Deal Did’, Political Science Quarterly, 124:2 (Summer 2009), 251-268 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On the seventh podcast of American History Too! we turn our attention to the most cuddily of all US Presidents – Theodore ‘Teddy’ Roosevelt.  We pull apart ‘T.R.’s’ legacy in the context of American imperialism abroad and the rise of progressivism at home.  Malcolm argues that Roosevelt is a shining example of why nuance is required when we discuss historical figures, while Mark discusses the legitimacy of Roosevelt’s place on Mt. Rushmore alongside Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln.  What legacy can we ascribe arguably the first modern president?  We give you our views but it’s left up to you to decide. Finally, find out the truth behind the ‘Teddy Bear’ story and also how T.R. actually felt about the nickname! We’ll be back in a couple of weeks when we’ll hopefully be joined by another special guest to discuss the 1930s.  Until then, thanks again for listening! Mark and Malcolm    Reading List: -          Michael Cullinane, ‘Imperial “Character”: How Race and Civilization Shaped Theodore Roosevelt’s Imperialism,’ America’s Transatlantic Turn: Theodore Roosevelt and the ‘Discovery’ of Europe, eds. Hans Krabbendam and John M. Thompson (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). -          Kathleen M. Dalton, ‘Theodore Roosevelt’s Contradictory Legacies:  From Imperialist Nationalism to Advocacy of a Progressive Welfare State,’ A Companion to Theodore Roosevelt, ed. Serge Ricard (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011) -          Peter G. Filene, “An Obituary for ‘The Progressive Movement’,” American Quarterly 22 (1970), 20-34 -          Fabian Hilfrich, Debating American Exceptionalism: Empire and Democracy in the Wake of the Spanish-American War (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), Chp.2. Also see Ken Burns’ excellent recent documentary series The Roosevelts: An Intimate History (2014) Our Holiday Reading recommendations -          W. Bernard Carlson, Tesla: Inventor of the electrical age (2013) -          Eric Schlosser, Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety (2013) -          Gary Younge, No place like home: A black Briton journeys through the American South (2000) -          Raymond Arsenault, Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice (2007) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On the sixth episode of American History Too! we leave the tawdry goings-on of the Gilded Age far behind and for this cheery Christmas special we examine the subject of Nuclear Fallout in the context of the early Cold War (1945-1960).  Malcolm, who specialises in this area, guides us through the history of the nuclear bomb:  How was it first conceived and why was it deployed?  How close were the Nazis to securing the bomb?  What’s so special about a hydrogen (or ‘super’) bomb?  Is it conceivable that a bomb could be constructed that would destroy the entire world?  In what ways have governments chosen to educate (or not) their citizenry about what would happen in the case of nuclear war?  Duck and cover as Malcolm takes us on this tour de force of nuclear history.  We hope all of our listeners have a great holiday season and we’ll be back with the force of nature that was Teddy Roosevelt early next year.  As usual, we would love to hear feedback on the podcasts as we are very receptive to making improvements for future episodes.  Thanks again for listening this year, we really appreciate it! Cheers, Mark Malcolm Reading List -          Hennessey, Peter, The Secret State: Preparing for the Worst, 1945-2010, 2nd edition (London: Penguin, 2010) -          Hughes, Jeff, ‘The Strath Report: Britain Confronts the H-Bomb, 1954–1955,’ History and Technology: An International Journal, 19:3 (2003), 257-275 -          Jones, Matthew, After Hiroshima: The United States, Race, and Nuclear Weapons in Asia, 1945-1965 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010) -          Winkler, Allan M., Life Under A Cloud: American Anxiety About the Atom (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1993) -          Shapiro, Jerome F., Atomic Bomb Cinema: The Apocalyptic Imagination on Film (London: Routledge, 2002) -          http://www.civildefensemuseum.com/index.html Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On the fifth episode of American History Too! we dive into a time period that, economic history aside, often gets lost in historical discussion – The Gilded Age.  We parse out the main issues of the era such as the end of Reconstruction and the establishment of segregation in both North and South, the prevailing culture of corruption, and the inexorable rise of big business.  We encounter colourful characters along the way, including Boss Tweed and the Molly Maguires, while Malcolm reveals his distaste for one of the Gilded Age’s shining lights (terrible pun intended), Thomas Edison.  In case you were wondering who invented the modern world – it was all down to the Serbian Nikola Tesla.  Also, find out what presidential election, according to Mark, featured the best named combatants in American History. All this and much more on this week’s American History Too! We hope you enjoy the podcast and we will be back in two weeks with a Christmas special. Remember to get in touch at @ahtoopodcast, @contestedground and @markmclay1985 Cheers, Mark and Malcolm Reading List Kevin Kenny, ‘The Molly Maguires in Popular Culture’, Journal of American Ethnic History, 14:4 (Summer, 1995), pp. 27-46 Richard Schneirov, ‘Thoughts on Periodizing the Gilded Age: Capital Accumulation, Society, and Politics, 1873-1898,’ Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era 5:3 (July 2006) Nicolas Barreyre, ‘The Politics of Economic Crises: The Panic of 1873, the End of Reconstruction, and the Realignment of American Politics,’ The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 10:4 (Oct. 2011) Kenneth D. Ackerman, Boss Tweed: The Corrupt Pol Who Conceived the Soul of Modern New York (Carroll Graf, 2005) Podcast Recommendation In Our Time on Social Darwinism - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03vgq1q Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The fourth episode of American History Too! delves into the United States’ deadliest conflict to date – The American Civil War.  To help us with this mammoth task we bring on board University of Edinburgh lecturer, Dr David Silkenat.  David teaches a course here at Edinburgh on the American Civil War and, among his various publications, he has published a well-received, award-winning book entitled Moments of Despair: Suicide, Divorce, and Debt in Civil War Era North Carolina.  David guides us through how the Civil War legacy’s remains a contentious bone in the American South.  We then turn our attentions North and discuss the role of Copperheads (opponents of the war) in fomenting dissension – both rhetorical and violent – against the both the conflict and Abraham Lincoln.  In particular, David – a native New Yorker – offers us his take on the New York Draft Riots of July 1863 that ended with roughly 120 dead and 2,000 wounded in the nation’s biggest metropolis. In addition, we hear how the Bush Administration used Abraham Lincoln as a justification for Guantanamo Bay, Mark tells the story of the first African American scientist who now has a coffee shop named after him in Glasgow, and Malcolm lets us know from which historical event the San Francisco 49ers took their name.  All this and much more this week on American History Too! Thanks again for listening and as always any feedback is always welcome.  Find us at @ahtoopodcast, @contestedground and @markmclay1985 Also, please check out David’s podcast at @AHuntucked Cheers, Mark Malcolm   Reading List: -          Jennifer Weber, Copperheads: the rise and fall of Lincoln’s opponents in the North (New York:  Oxford University Press, 2006) -          Joan E. Cashin (ed), The war was you and me : civilians in the American Civil War (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, c2002) -          Kenneth D. Ackerman, Boss Tweed: The rise and fall of the corrupt pol who conceived the soul of Modern New York (2005) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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This third episode of American History Too! is all about one man – the seventh President of the United States, Andrew Jackson (1829-1837).  In particular, we debate Jackson’s role in the removal of Native Americans from their ancestral homes in the East to newly allotted land west of the Mississippi in the 1830s. Before jumping into the Indian controversy, we bring you up to speed with what’s being happening the US since our last podcast on the Constitution – all in two minutes!  We then dive straight into work of historian Francis Prucha and explain – with the help of other historians such Mary Young and Jon Meacham – why his attempt to rehabilitate Jackson’s image is greatly flawed.   We also debate Jackson’s legacy with regards to the Native Americans – is Jackson a game changer or merely a colourful character? In addition, Richard Nixon is mentioned an obscene amount of times for a nineteenth century podcast, Malcolm misguidedly attempts to rank Jimmy Carter in the higher echelons of American presidencies, and we most definitely do not discuss the tariff.  Finally, we answer our listener Francesca’s question on whether – as suggested in The West Wing – Andrew Jackson really did have a big block of cheese in the White House. We hope you enjoy this third episode (which also features improved audio quality from our first two efforts) and please let us know if you have any comments, questions, or suggestions. Cheers, Mark Malcolm (Contact us on Twitter at @ahtoopodcast or by email at ahtoo@outlook.com) Reading List:          Francis Paul Prucha, ‘Andrew Jackson’s Indian Policy: A Reassessment’, Journal of American History  56 (1969), pp.527-539 (available on JSTOR).          Mary Young, ‘The Cherokee Nation: Mirror of the Republic’, American Quarterly, 33 (1981), pp.502-24.          Ronald N Satz, "Indian Policy in the Jacksonian Era," in Leonard Dinnerstein and Kenneth T. Jackson (eds.),  American Vistas 1607-1877 (New York and Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1995), 211-227.           Jon Meacham, American lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House (New York : Random House, 2008) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The second episode of American History Too! focuses on the Constitution of the United States.  To help us understand the goings-on down eighteenth century Philadelphia way, we bring aboard our very own American, and revolutionary scholar, Jane Judge.  During the podcast we examine why the US even needed a constitution, and whether it was all an exercise in elites getting richer or just a way of giving the British the intellectual middle-finger.  Malcolm also gets put on the spot regarding his comments in the last podcast, Jane tells us that Charles Beard is not a man to be listened to, and Mark argues that this is the first moment in American History where the axiom of the ‘New World’ is justified.  What’s more, we investigate whether Anti-Federalists were indeed ‘men of little faith’ and why Massachusetts was the most high-maintenance of all the former colonies.   Finally, we leap forward into the twenty-first century and discuss the relevance of the second amendment (hello AK-47s) and the legacy of the Founding Fathers in modern America. All this and much more on this week’s American History Too!.  Thanks to all of you who listened to the first podcast and we will be back in two weeks with a discussion of ever-fascinating Andrew Jackson. Cheers, Mark Malcolm       Saul Cornell, ‘Aristocracy Assailed: The Ideology of Backcountry Anti-Federalism’, Journal of American History 76 (1990), pp.1148-1172      Cecelia M. Kenyon, ‘Men of Little Faith: The Anti-Federalists and the Nature of Representative Government’, William and Mary Quarterly, 12 (1955), pp.3-42    Lance Banning, ‘Republican Ideology and the Triumph of the Constitution, 1789 to 1793’, William and Mary Quarterly, 31 (1974), pp.167-188       Charles Beard, An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United States (New York: Macmillan, 1921 [c1913]) – for full text see http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433080136850;view=1up;seq=1      Pauline Maier, Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788, (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2010)      Pauline Maier, American scripture : making the Declaration of Independence (New York:  Knopf, 1997)       Edmund S. Morgan, Inventing the people the rise of popular sovereignty in England and America, (New York: Norton, 1988) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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 This first podcast from two tutors at the University of Edinburgh (Mark McLay and Dr Malcolm Craig) looks at the introduction of slavery to the Southern colonies in the seventeenth century. We examine the eternal debate - 'Did slavery lead to racism or did racism lead to slavery?' - and we consider why we even bother trying to answer this question.  In addition, we delve into the key debates that surround this question and give our views on the arguments of leading historical works of this period.  Finally, we opine on the legacy that the introduction of slavery bequeathed the founders of the United States in the late eighteenth century. All this - and yet we still manage to dodge an emergency and wrongly predict the outcome of the Scottish Independence Referendum! We hope you enjoy the podcast and stick around for the next episode - appearing in two weeks time - which will pick apart the debates surrounding the formation of the United States.      Mark Malcolm      Historiography included in discussion:     - Oscar and Mary Handlin, 'Origins of the Southern Labor System,' William and Mary Quarterly VI1.2 (April 1950), 199-222    - Edmund S. Morgan, 'Slavery and Freedom: The American Paradox,' Journal of American History 59 (June 1972), 5-29.    - David Eltis, ‘Europeans and the Rise and Fall of African Slavery in the Americas: An Interpretation’, American Historical Review 98 (1993): pp.1399-1423.   - Peter Kolchin, American Slavery, 1619-1877, (New York, 1993), Chs. 1,2.   - Peter J. Parish, Slavery: History and Historians, (New York, 1989), Chs. 1, 2   - T. H. Breen, 'A Changing Labor Force and Race Relations in Virginia, 1660-1710,' in T. H. Breen (ed.), Shaping Southern Society: The Colonial Experience (New York: Oxford University Press, 1976), pp.116-134      Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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