MPR News with Kerri Milleractive
In-depth conversations on news and culture, with host Kerri Miller.
Country Of Origin |
USA
Produced In |
St. Paul, MN
Related Hashtags |
#Line3 ,
#mnleg ,
#mnstorms ,
#mnwx ,
#mprraccoon
Frequency |
Daily

This podcast currently has no reviews.

Submit Review

231 Episodes Available

Average duration:00:36:18

View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller talked harassment and change eight months into #MeToo with Robert Sutton, a Stanford professor of Organizational Behavoir, and Danielle Paquette, a Washington Post reporter focusing on national labor issues.
View episode
Counter Stories react to President Trump "zero tolerance" immigration policy, which led to parents and children being separated at the U.S border.
View episode
MPR's Stephanie Curtis shares her top five things to see, watch read and experience.
View episode
As usual, when MPR News host Kerri Miller asked listeners to share their favorite summer reads, the phone lines lit up with eager callers. Miller was joined by two experts in all things literary: Dara Beevas, the co-founder and chief strategic officer of Wise Ink Creative Publishing based in Minneapolis and Carlos Lazoda, the non-fiction book critic for the Washington Post. They shared all the books they can't put down with MPR News Host Kerri Miller.
View episode
MPR News Host Kerri Miller asked Jennifer Carnahan, the Minnesota state chair for the GOP, and Russell Berman, a staff writer at the Atlantic, about what Minnesotans think of having President Trump at the helm of the Republican Party and how will those feelings affect the midterms in the fall.
View episode
MPR News Host Kerri Miller spoke with Dr. Charles Reznikoff addiction specialist at Hennepin Healthcare and Dr. Traci Green associate professor of emergency medicine at Boston Medical Center, about how the crisis has evolved over the last year.
View episode
Is it constitutional to require public-sector employees to pay union fees, even if they are non-members? Or is is a violation of the First Amendment to force workers to financially support an organization they might not politically agree with? The Supreme Court is expected to answer this question in Janus v. AFSCME Council 31 any day now. MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with Associate Professor of history Jon Shelton of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and Center of the American Experiment Vice President Kim Crockett.
View episode
Politicians and voters alike are expressing concern with the Trump administration's so-called "zero-tolerance" policy at the U.S.-Mexico border. What will this mean for immigration legislation? MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to Politico immigration reporter Ted Hesson on what to expect out of Washington D.C.
View episode
Earlier this year President Donald Trump announced tariffs on steel and aluminum. Now Canada, Mexico and Europe have said they will retaliate. So what does that mean for American businesses and consumers? Two guests joined host Kerri Miller to discuss. Pradnya Joshi is the editor of trade and agriculture at Politico. Mary Lovely is a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute.
View episode
It's national Pollinator Week, and host Kerri Miller spoke to two horticulturists about how to have a successful garden full of vegetables and healthy fruit trees. They tackled questions about insects and other pests, blight, transplanting and more. Julie Weisenhorn, is an associate extension professor at the University of Minnesota in the Department of Horticultural Science, and Emily Tepe is a researcher in horticulture on edibles including fruits, also at the University of Minnesota.
View episode
President Donald Trump is striking out at China and Canada with tariffs, attempting to level the playing field for U.S. producers. Host Kerri Miller spoke with Political Junkie Ken Rudin about trade policy and more.
View episode
Women diagnosed with breast cancer often have a combined treatment of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. Now a new nine-year study published in the New England Journal of Medicine determined that for some women, chemo can be replaced with a hormone-blocking drug treatment.
View episode
Suicide is a growing issue in the United States. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control found that the rate of suicide increased in almost every state. A separate study found that Minnesota has one of the highest rates of depression in the country. What can be done to buck this growing trend?Kathryn Cullen, Division Chief of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Minnesota, and Daphne Merkin author of "This Close to Happy: A Reckoning With Depression," joined MPR News Host Kerri Miller for a conversation about how to spot signs of depression and support those who are struggling with it.
View episode
Pirates, prize fighters and disgraced politicians have all been pardoned. Today on MPR News two legal scholars join MPR News host Kerri Miller for a conversation about who earns a presidential pardon and why?
View episode
Ken Rudin, host of the Political Junkie podcast joins MPR News Host Kerri Miller each Monday to discuss the latest news from Washington. This week they discussed President Trump's performance at the G7 summit, what to look for in the President's meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, and Mr. Trump's strategy on the use of presidential pardons.
View episode
Host Kerri Miller talked to Cathy ten Broeke, director to Prevent and End Homelessness at Minnesota Interagency Council on Homelessness, about our current state of homelessness. They were joined by Ehren Stover-Wright, research director, Institute for Community Alliances to look at his agency's work in Des Moines, Iowa.
View episode
Poet Gregorgy ardlo joined MPR host Kerri Miller for a conversation about the ways in which trauma can both shatter and fortify a family's bonds.
View episode
A happy work life can make for a happy life all around. MPR News Host Kerri Miller spoke with two workplace-advice columnists about how to make the most out of careers. Rob Walker writes the column "Workologist" in The New York Times and Alison Green writes the Ask A Manager column for The Cut. Below is some of their advice.
View episode
James Farnsworth is a political activist and student at the University of Minnesota. He joined Katharine Tinucci, senior vice president of MZA Company, and the former campaign manager for Mark Dayton, and MPR News Host Kerri Miller for a conversation about how Democrats feel about the party chaos.
View episode
He spoke with MPR's Kerri Miller Tuesday morning, and said he plans to use several techniques to fix the city's housing crisis. One is inclusionary zoning.
View episode
NASA launched the New Horizons mission to Pluto in January 2006. It was a long-anticipated project that almost didn't happen. As Alan Stern, planetary scientist and manager of the project, wrote in the new book he co-authored, "It was disappointing to me to learn that senior scientists insisted that a mission to Pluto wasn't justified simply for its exploration value." Stern joined MPR News host Kerri Miller to discuss his new book, "Chasing New Horizons: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto," which he co-authored with David Grinspoon.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller talked to Anthony Winer who is a professor at the Mitchell Hamline School of Law about what conclusions can be drawn from the court's ruling.
View episode
After the 2016 presidential election, Washington Post Reporter Dan Balz traveled across the upper Midwest speaking with supporters of President Trump about their reactions to his presidency so far.
View episode
President Trump made headlines this morning by tweeting that he has the power to pardon himself. Ken Rudin, the host of the Political Junkie podcast talked about how presidents have used that power in the past.
View episode
MPR News Host Kerri Miller spoke with the former acting head of U.S Immigration and Customs Enforcement, John Sandweg and Linus Chan, Associate Clinical Professor of Law at the University of Minnesota, about how ICE has historically operated and what types of changes have been made since President Trump took office.
View episode
How do people become radicalized? Journalist and author Asne Seierstad wanted to find out, so she followed two young women who went to Syria to support ISIS.
View episode
After conducting a house by house survey the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that over 4,600 people died as a result of the hurricane and the residual lack of access to health care. Latino USA editor Julio Ricardo Varela has been following the death toll closely and spoke with MPR News reporter Euan Kerr about the significance of these findings.
View episode
In this episode Counter Stories host take a look at how corporations handle race and racism.
View episode
MPR reporter Brandt Williams spoke withJenan Mohajir, director of Student Leadership at Interfaith Youth Core in Chicago, and Hanadi Chehabeddine, a public speaker whose work focuses on dismantling misconceptions about Islam, to learn more about them month-long holiday.
View episode
Journalist Steven Brill wanted to find out why so many Americans have lost faith in their government. He talked to MPR News Senior Producer, Stephanie Curtis about what he learned while writing his new book, "Tailspin: The people and Forces Behind America's Fifty-Year Fall--and Those Fighting to Reverse It."
View episode
Political Junkie Ken Rudin talked to MPR News host Chris Farrell about the on-again-off-again North Korea and all the latest news from Washington DC.
View episode
MPR News reporter Brandt Williams hosted a conversation about why people of color are so quickly categorized as engaging in "suspicious behavior." Raj Sethuraju is an assistant professor in the School of Law Enforcement at Metropolitan State University. Verna Myers, inclusion strategist and cultural innovator, and author of "Moving Diversity Forward: how to go from Well-Meaning to Well-Doing" and "What if I Say the Wrong Thing?"
View episode
The world was in the middle of a financial crisis 10 years ago. When the economy stabilized the 2010 Dodd-Frank law was passed to prevent another major financial meltdown. So why did Congress just vote to roll back some of those Dodd-Frank rules? MPR news host Chris Farrell talked to 3 guests for perspectives on the new financial rules.
View episode
In this episode Counter Stories the team looks at U.S. history of lynching, and how the trauma of this crime continues to affects people of color.
View episode
Hours after North Korea said that it destroyed its nuclear test site, President Trump called off his meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. What happens next? Host Stephanie Curtis spoke to journalist and expert, Jean Lee.
View episode
This week on Climate Cast, host Paul Huttner and his guests assessed the state of Minnesota's renewable energy economy, infrastructure, and the potential for accelerated growth. Plus, a climate fiction story and an update on the shrinking Colorado River.
View episode
DFL Gov. Mark Dayton on Tuesday vetoed the main work of the Republican-led Legislature this year and vowed not to call a special session to work things out, saying, "They had their chance." MPR's politics reporter Brian Bakst joined host Euan Kerr to talk about the vetoes.
View episode
Host Euan Kerr talked about the footie with authors of "Men in Blazers, Encyclopedia Blazertannica" Robert Bennett and Michael Davis. Then, Euan spoke to Megan Ryan, who covers Minnesota United FC and Major League Soccer for the Star Tribune, and Wes Burdine, who hosts a soccer podcast, and will be opening up a soccer-themed bar in St. Paul this summer.
View episode
Psychologist and professor Dayna Touron's work suggests, it's not that the mind loses its ability to remember, people feel less confident about using it. She and Jean Seils, a guitar and ukulele teacher at the MacPhail center for music, joined host Chris Farrell to talk about learning new skills later in life.
View episode
Host Tom Weber looks back at his bus ride from Duluth, Minn. where three black men were lynched in 1920 to Montgomery, Ala. for the opening of a memorial to honor the thousands of African-American men, women and children that were lynched in America. He is joined by two guests: Kiara Boone, Deputy Program Manager, Equal Justice Initiative and Carl Crawford, Human Rights at City Hall, Duluth. A warning to listeners: This program contains strong language that some may find upsetting.
View episode
Graduates are in luck--the job market is the best it's been in a decade. So how can they take advantage of that? MPR News host Chris Farrell spoke with Georgene Huang, founder and CEO of fairygodboss.com and Caroline Kitchener, the author of "Post-Grad: Five Women and Their First Year out of College." They provided these six tips for recent graduates.
View episode
DFL and GOP leaders talk about the 2018 Legislative Session. Rep. Melissa Hortman, Sen. Tom Bakk, Speaker Kurt Daudt and Sen. Paul Gazelka joined the program.
View episode
The farm bill used to be an example of bipartisan legislation? So why didn't it pass this time?
View episode
Political Junkie Ken Rudin discussed recent primaries, the Robert Mueller investigation and trade negotiations with MPR News host Chris Farrell.
View episode
Brides Brides Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images What's the secret to a successful relationship? Two marriage and family experts say it all comes down to how you fight. Clinical psychologist and author, Daphne de Marneffe and director of the Marriage and Family Therapy Program at the University of Minnesota, Bill Doherty had 12 tips for perfecting the art of constructive conflict.
View episode
MPR Host Kerri Miller asked two education scholars why this movement is happening now. Guest: Jon Shelton, assistant professor, democracy and justice studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. Guest: Richard Ingersoll, professor of education and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with journalists Susan Chira about her reporting on current and former female employees of Ford's Chicago automotive plants. Together with Karla Altmayer, a lawyer and co-founder of Chicago-based Healing to Action, they discussed how to change the culture in industries that are male dominated, and workplaces in which women struggle to wield any kind of power.
View episode
Political Junkie Ken Rudin discusses President Trump's positive polling on international affairs.
View episode
When journalist and new mother Sara Zaske moved to Germany, she noticed that her new friends had a very different approach to parenting and a big emphasis on teaching their kids self-reliance.
View episode
Milo Fleming, a top three finalist for "Top Chef, Jr." in January 2018; Ed Jenkins, the host of the web series, "Lalo's Lunchbox," and Tricia Armstrong, a speech pathologist at Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, where she specializes in working with infants and children with feeding difficulties, joined the program to talk about what to do to make kids adventurous eaters.
View episode
Kate Bowler is an Assistant Professor at Duke Divinity School and the author of "Everything Happens for a Reason: And other Lies I've Loved." She spoke with MPR News Host Kerri Miller about experience. This is a rebroadcast.
View episode
Our world runs on precision: from the computers we use to the vehicles we drive, we rely on perfectly balanced measurements and time increments.
View episode
Greg Tikalsky spoke to Kerri Miller about his battle to get drivers to put the phone down after he lost his father to a distracted driver.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller talked to two volcano experts about the science of lava and volcanoes, and lots of listeners weighed in on Twitter with their own volcano stories.
View episode
In the wake of the deadly school shooting in Florida last February, several state legislatures have had passed new gun control bills, but Minnesota's lawmakers haven't responded as quickly.
View episode
Meet generation M: young, independent Muslim women who are changing the way Americans perceive them. Today on MPR News, two women joined Kerri Miller for a conversation about what it's like to be a young, Muslim woman in America today: b Blair Imani is the executive director Equality for HER b Ikhlas Saleem co-hosts the Identity Politics podcast.
View episode
Political Junkie Ken Rudin analyzed what President Trump's new lawyer Rudy Giuliani may or may not have said over the weekend.
View episode
Rent and home prices are surging in the metro. What ideas are being proposed to bring those costs down? Kerri Miller spoke to several guests to try to tackle this issue.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to Politico senior investigative reporter, Josh Meyer and George Washington University law professor Randall Eliason about what strategies Robert Mueller and President Trump's legal teams might take as the special counsel investigation continues.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller led a discussion about whether Christian colleges are welcoming young Christians who may hold different views.
View episode
Tanzina Vega has reported on America's changing demographics for CNN and The New York Times. She starts hosting "The Takeaway" on Monday, May 7.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller recently sat down with Julie Weisenhorn, a horticulturalist and extension educator at the University of Minnesota, to help answer some of those pressing planting questions.
View episode
As part of MPR's Broadcast Journalist Series, MPR executive news editor Mike Edgerly interviewed David Fahrenthold at the University of St. Thomas on April 30, 2018.
View episode
In April 2018, actor Bill Cosby was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault against Andrea Constand, a woman he mentored. Does that mean we can't enjoy watching reruns of the Cosby Show or I Spy anymore?
View episode
When a Toronto mass murder suspect threatened a police officer with a gun, the officer holstered his own weapon and de-escalated the situation. What can we learn about police tactics from his example? David Thomas is an associate professor at Florida Gulf Coast University and a former police officer. Yasmeen Krameddine is director of research and development at Pro Training
View episode
cientists are not often trained in the art of communication. So how can they get their work out into the world? MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke about science and story telling to Peter Doherty--professor of immunology at the University of Melbourne, Australia and winner of the Nobel Prize in 1996. She also talked to Juli Trtnj, director of NOAA's climate and heat health program.
View episode
Political Junkie Ken Rudin joined the program to talk about the White House Correspondent's Dinner and Michelle Wolf's comments about Sarah Huckabee Sanders.
View episode
Music can't change the world, but it can motivate a generation to protest as it did during the Vietnam War era. History is filled with protest songs that speak to our troubled past and present. Kerri Miller spoke with rapper Brother Ali about this as well as NPR hip-hop reporter, Rodney Carmichael.
View episode
Wisconsin is putting out ads in Minnesota and Chicago, trying to encourage millennials to move to their state. Host Kerri Miller was joined by Bridgit Bowden,a reporter from Wisconsin Public Radio and Matt Lewis the director of Make It MSP.
View episode
MPR's Catharine Richert joined to the program to explain what this means for the clinic.
View episode
When we hear "Democrat" or "Republican," certain labels come to mind: Democrats are "lefties," God-hating, welfare-loving, socialists. Republicans are racist, sexist, and anti-government. But how accurate are these stereotypes? Host Kerri Miller spoke with four guests about how stereotypes are unhelpful to open political conversations. This is the second of two parts.
View episode
When we hear "Democrat" or "Republican," certain labels come to mind: Democrats are "lefties," God-hating, welfare-loving, socialists. Republicans are racist, sexist, and anti-government. But how accurate are these stereotypes? Host Kerri Miller spoke with four guests about how stereotypes are unhelpful to open political conversations. This is the first of two parts.
View episode
Some are calling this the 2018 version of the Year of the Woman, with nearly 60 percent more women running for the House and Senate than in 2016. But women candidates are still getting questions about how they'll juggle family responsibilities, where they'll get enough campaign money and how influential they can be once they're elected--the same questions that female candidates have been getting since the early days of politics. MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to Jennifer Lawless, the director of women and politics at American University, about this surge. Miller also spoke to Jennifer Carnahan, chair of the Republican Party of Minnesota, and Lauren Beecham, director of womenwinning (sic). Miller ask guests how women can maintain this momentum.
View episode
Iran's president has made it very clear he won't renegotiate. President Trump has called the Iran nuclear deal "the worst deal ever." Why does he dislike it so much? And what would happen if he backed out of it? Nahal Toosi, foreign affairs correspondent for Politico, joined MPR News host Kerri Miller to discuss.
View episode
A group of strangers band together to protect the new remaining trees and in the process, find out that the trees are communicating with each other. "The Overstory" is set in a world where, as novelist Richard Powers writes, trees have this to say about humans: "Your kind never sees us whole. You miss the half of it, and more. There's always as much below ground as above."
View episode
A state administrative law judge recommended that state regulators approve the so-called Line 3 project - but only if the new pipeline is built along the same route as the current line. Reporter Dan Kraker spoke with host Kerri Miller about what that means for proponents and opponents of the pipeline.
View episode
In the book, "The Displaced," novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen reminds the reader, "These displaced persons are mostly unwanted where they fled from; unwanted where they are... in refugee camps; and unwanted where they go." Nguyen edited the new collection of essays. Nguyen and Kao Kalia Yang, who wrote the memoir "The Song Poet," joined MPR News host Kerri Miller to talk about what it means to feel unwanted in your new land.
View episode
On Tuesday the U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments in a Texas redistricting case. At issue is whether state house and congressional maps intentionally discriminated against minority voters in Texas. MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to Matt Ford of The New Republic about gerrymandering.
View episode
Author Leni Zumas explores what it would be like if everyone gave up the fight for reproductive rights. MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to Zumas about "Red Clocks," some of which she based on her own experiences trying to conceive a son as a single mother.
View episode
A conversation with Native American students at the University of Minnesota Morris.
View episode
MPR News guest host Stephanie Curtis spoke to foreign policy staff writer Emily Tamkin and staff writer at The Atlantic, Uri Friedman about America's current style of diplomacy.
View episode
Host Mike Edgerly spoke with Dr. Charles Reznikoff and attorney Susan Gaertner about these developments.
View episode
Mary Hockaday joined MPR News executive news editor Mike Edgerly to talk about how her team picks which stories to cover each day, how they contend with the proliferation of fake news, and how the BBC covers the U.S. in the Donald Trump era.
View episode
Dramatic photos of an emaciated polar bear caught the world's attention in a way that climate-change data and dire warnings about loss of Arctic sea ice never could. The photographer responsible for the photo is Cristina Mittermeier, who is also a trained marine biologist. She describes the photography she does--for National Geographic and others--as "conservation photography". Mittermeier joined Mike Edgerly, MPR News executive news editor, to talk about the power of photographs to teach and inspire people to action.
View episode
The hosts are skeptical that bias training will change hearts and minds ingrained in racism.
View episode
MPR news host, and Marketplace senior contributor, Chris Farrell looked at antitrust laws with Lina Khan, director of Legal Policy with the Open Markets Institute.
View episode
Tax filing time is a reminder to review your finances and recommit to those New Year's financial resolutions, personal finance expert Lynnette Khalfani-Cox said Wednesday in an interview with MPR News economics commentator Chris Farrell.
View episode
A new Minnesota-based, black-owned credit union is hoping to change this. MPR host Chris Farrell spoke with two guests on credit unions and the importance of diversity: Me'Lea Connelly is the director at the Association for Black Economic Power and Mike Schenk is the vice president of research and policy analysis at the Credit Union National Association.
View episode
On Friday the U.S., Britain and France launched military strikes into Syria following an apparent chemical attack on civilians from President Bashar Assad's forces. What did the strike accomplish and what does it mean for the conflict in Syria? Amanda Sloat is a senior fellow in the Brookings Center on the United States and Europe. She spoke with host Kerri Miller about the attack.
View episode
Morgan Jerkins' collection of essays, "This Will Be My Undoing" explores what it means to be young, black, female and feminist.
View episode
Getting the Alzheimer's patient into a study before they exhibited symptoms is the goal. But is it beneficial to the patient to know they might have a disease with no known cure? New research conducted by doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. might redefine Alzheimer's. Researchers have developed a new brain scan and spinal fluid test that look for physical changes in the brain which may signal that a patient has Alzheimer's before symptoms appear. The tests aren't ready for routine use in patient care, and doctors will continue to rely on the diagnostic tools they've long used to determine whether a patient has Alzheimer's. But what do the tests mean for the way people think about aging and the disease? And what would be the ethical implications for an early Alzheimer's diagnosis? Two guests joined host Kerri Miller to talk about the latest development in Alzheimer's research. Dr. Ronald Petersen directs the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Professor Susan Wolf is the is the McKnight Presidential Professor of Law, Medicine Public Policy at the University of Minnesota.
View episode
"That sense of being touch with something dark and deep was part of the lure [of addiction]," Jamison told host Kerri Miller when talking about her book, "The Recovering: Intoxication and its Aftermath." They were also joined by Dr. Joseph Lee
View episode
Both Democrats and Republicans have seen major splinters in their party since the 2016 election. Does that mean that third parties will have a better shot at success in this year's midterms? Reed Galen and Kathryn Pearson joined the discussion.
View episode
Ken Rudin said he could hardly blink during the interview between Comey and George Stephanopoulos.
View episode
Wells Fargo is embroiled in yet another banking scandal. Reuters reports the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a U.S. watchdog agency, could soon force Wells Fargo to pay a massive fine--several hundred million dollars--for mortgage-lending and auto-insurance abuses. So how can consumers protect themselves against potential abuse? MPR's Kerri Miller spoke to two industry experts about practical actions consumers can take: John Taylor, president and CEO of the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, Stacy Cowley, reporter for the New York Times.
View episode
President Trump this week threatened to send missiles into Syria. But how should the U.S. be involved in Syria? Firas Maksad director of the Arabia Foundation joined host Kerri Miller.
View episode
MPR's Executive director for News and Programming took audience calls about how the newsroom's editorial system works.
View episode
MPR News Host Kerri Miller spoke with Domenico Montanaro, NPR's lead editor for politics and digital audience, about how this shakeup will be felt beyond Congressional leadership.
View episode
The money from hunting and fishing licenses go conservation efforts across the state. Two guests joined host Kerri Miller to discuss this dilemma. Meadow Kouffeld-Hansen is a conservationist, hunter and faculty member at Itasca Community College. Paul Telander is the chief of the Wildlife section of the Fish and Wildlife division of the DNR.
View episode
How much of the rhetoric and decision-making around immigration is based in fact? And how much is driven by partisan political agendas? And why is it so difficult to make the facts stick, no matter what your politics are on the issue? MPR News host Kerri Miller asked two guests to help parse out the facts from myths. She spoke with Alan Gomez, immigration reporter for USA Today and Laura Collins, deputy director of economic growth at the George W. Bush Institute.
View episode
University of Minnesota's Kathryn Pearson joined the program to talk about Ryan's legacy and what this means for the Republican party in the age of Trump.
View episode
The Minnesota legislature is considering a bill that would require some level of work or community service. Tara O'Neill Hayse of the American Action Forum and Dr. Nathan Chomilo joined host Kerri Miller to discuss what this would mean for Minnesotans.
View episode
Writer Sandra Allen received a fat manila envelope in the mail one day, filled with a stack of yellowed paper about a half inch thick. Allen had always heard about "crazy" Uncle Bob, but the manuscript they read that day opened up a window into the complex mind of someone living with mental illness. Allen joined host Kerri Miller to talk about their book, "A Kind of Mirraculas Paradise."
View episode
Louise Matsakis staff writer for WIRED joined MPR News host Kerri Miller for a conversation about how to protect your privacy online.
View episode
Ken Rudin joined host Kerri Miller to talk all things politics, as he usually does. This time, they discussed President Trump's back and forth with China on tariffs.
View episode
Chinese tariffs on American imports are being imposed crops, like soybeans. Farmers, who predominantly voted for President Trump, will feel the impact of those tariffs. Economist Mary Lovely and Politico editor Pradnya Joshi joined host Kerri Miller to talk about the political and economic implications of a trade war.
View episode
Two physicians and one patient talk about the importance of communication in healthcare.
View episode
A wave of teacher protests has swept the country in recent months. This wave of political engagement comes after years of what some call a "war on teachers." MPR Host Kerri Miller spoke to Richard Ingersoll, professor of education and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and Jon Shelton, assistant professor of Democracy and Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.
View episode
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify before Congress next week in a hearing about data privacy. The company has been embroiled in a scandal with data firm Cambridge Analytica, which reportedly mined information from millions of Facebook users without their knowledge. Facebook has been slow to enact meaningful privacy reforms. Host Kerri Miller took a look at whether this will ultimately hurt the company's image with Brian Feldman, of New York Magazine, and Hayley Tsukayama, of the Washington Post.
View episode
Activist and organizer DeRay Mckesson joined the program to talk about Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy.
View episode
Do you find your struggling to strike the balance between giving your kids structure without helicoptering too much? When journalist and new mother Sara Zaske moved to Germany, she noticed that her new friends were raising self-reliant kids without any fuss.Kerri Miller spoke with Zaske about the parenting trends she adopted and with Harvard psychologist Dr. Bobbi Wegner about why certain approaches are more successful than others.
View episode
Political Junkie host Ken Rudin and assistant professor Kelly Dittmar joined host Kerri Miller to talk about why some of these women voted for President Trump and how they feel about it now. Dittmar is in the political science department at Rutgers, Camden campus.
View episode
Science and math training are important for those hoping to work in STEM. But what about empathy? Do scientists and engineers need to develop emotional intelligence?
View episode
President Trump fired Veterans Affairs secretary David Shulkin last night. The President said he plans to replace him with his personal physician Dr. Ronnie Jackson, but this appointment will have to be confirmed by the Senate. Nikki Wentland is a veterans reporter for Stars and Strips. She joined host Kerri Miller to talk about what it all means.
View episode
James spoke with host Kerri Miller about her memoir, "Odd Girl Out."
View episode
Earlier this year, the American Academy of Pediatrics updated their guidelines for depression screening. They now recommend all teens 12 to 18 be screened for depression. Host Kerri Miller was joined by two guests to talk about this change, Dr. Laura Richardson who is a pediatrician at Seattle Children's Hospital and professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Gregory Plemmons.
View episode
Veteran Brian Castner retraced the steps of Alexander Mackenzie, who in 1789 traveled 1,200 miles in search of the Northwest Passage. Castner's book, "Disappointment River" details his, and Mackenzie's, travels in Canada.
View episode
Statistician Leah Libresco used to think gun control was a way to stop mass shootings. Then she dug into the numbers and changed her mind. She spoke to host Kerri Miller about her piece in the Washington Post.
View episode
President Trump announced plans for tariffs on Chinese imports on Thursday, a move which is expected to trigger retaliation from the Chinese government. Host Chris Farrell was joined by Sung Won Sohn, an economics professor at California State University, Channel Islands and Robert Scott of the Economic Policy Institute to talk about the implications of a trade war.
View episode
Ken Rudin was joined by Chris Farrell to talk about Stormy Daniels' interview on "60 Minutes," regarding her alleged sexual encounter with President Trump while he was a private citizen. They also spoke about the seemingly constant personnel turnover in the White House and the March for Our Lives events that took place all over the country this weekend.
View episode
Women entrepreneurs share what they wish they'd known when they started their businesses.
View episode
2018 marks 100 years since the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The long legacy of this law is just one of the reasons National Geographic is declaring 2018 "The Year of the Bird." MPR News Guest Host Mike Edgerly speaks with Jonathan Franzen, a novelist and the author of a piece in National Geographic titled "Why Birds Matter." In the second half of the hour, local birder and blogger Ben Douglas gives his tips for finding and identifying birds in Minnesota.
View episode
A school resource officer in Maryland stopped a school shooter from hurting more people. Who are these officers and what are their roles in schools?
View episode
New research finds black boys and men face steep odds when it comes to economic opportunity in America - even when they're raised in the wealthiest one percent of households.
View episode
A recent national survey from nonprofit Stop Street Harassment found that 81 percent of women had experienced some form of sexual harassment during their lifetime. But so few of those women have sought legal recourse. The National Women's Law Center is looking to change that. Host Kerri Miller spoke about this shift with Chai Feldblum, the commissioner of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Maya Raghu, who is the director of Workplace Equality at the National Women's Law Center.
View episode
Robert J. Spitzer joined host Kerri Miller to talk about schools shootings, if they occur in clusters and if those clusters are inspired by news coverage. Spitzer is the chairman of the political science department at State University of New York, Cortland and the author of five books on gun policy, including "Guns across America: Reconciling Gun Rules and Rights."
View episode
Americans are finding jobs. A lot of jobs. U.S. employers added 313,000 jobs in February, putting the U.S. unemployment rate at a 17-year low. Why is the economy doing well? Who is it benefitting? And what does that mean for the American worker? MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to Wall Street Journal economy reporter Eric Morath and Michigan State University professor, Lisa Cook about the latest U.S. jobs report.
View episode
Ken Rudin, host of the Political Junkie podcast, joined the program to talk about recent staff changes at the White House. He spoke to host Kerri Miller.
View episode
Host Brandt Williams looked at the protections for children and vulerable adults that protect them from horrific cases of abuse and neglect. He spoke to Rich Gehrman, the executive director of Safe Passage for Children of Minnesota and Anita Raymond, the program manager for the Center for Excellence in Supported Decision Making.
View episode
What's the best way to shine a light on racism without giving it a platform to grow and prosper? It's a question that many newsrooms are struggling with throughout the country. MPR's Brandt Williams sat in the host seat for a conversation about best practices for reporting on racism. Williams was joined by Lois Beckett, senior reporter for the Guardian U.S.
View episode
President Trump is planning to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jun Un to discuss nuclear disarmament. But the President has just replaced his Secretary of State, there is still no U.S. ambassador to South Korea, and the State Department's point man on North Korea, Joseph Yun recently retired. How will this affect negotiations? MPR News' Stephanie Curtis spoke with Rudy DeLeon, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, about shifting dynamics on the Korean peninsula. DeLeon served as deputy secretary of defense under President Clinton.
View episode
What if we knew the day we would die? How would that affect how we live our lives? That's the premise at the heart of Chloe Benjamin's new novel, "The Immortalists." Host Kerri Miller spoke to Benjamin about the effect prophecy and prediction has on us.
View episode
This morning President Trump tweeted that C.I.A. Director Mike Pompeo will take over for Rex Tillerson as Secretary of State. Is this move just another staffing shake-up in a tumultuous administration? Or does this changing of the guard mark a significant pivot in U.S. foreign policy? MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with the following foreign policy experts about the change: Scott Jennings is a former special assistant to President George W. Bush. David Schanzer is the director of Duke University's Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security. Emily Tamkin is a staff writer for Foreign Policy Magazine. Andrew Bacevich is professor emeritus of history at Boston University.
View episode
Michael Wahid Hanna joined Kerri Miller for a discussion about America's complicated relationships with foreign allies. Does "America First" rhetoric weakens America's position as a global leader? Wahid Hanna is a senior fellow at the Century Foundation. Before Wahid Hanna joined the conversation, Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie, discussed the week's political news.
View episode
We invited three local Muslim artists, activists, and scholars to talk about the significance of films and series featuring Muslim-American protagonists.
View episode
Jeanne Lenzer, medical investigative journalist and author of "The Danger Within Us: America's Untested, Unregulated Medical Device Industry and One Man's Battle to Survive It" joined host Kerri Miller to discuss medical implants.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller looked at President Trump's leadership style with Hitendra Wadhwa, a professor at Columbia, and Tim Walch, director emeritus of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library.
View episode
: Second Amendment and gun ownership rights are one of the most fiercely debated issues of our day. So how did we get here?
View episode
A Wrinkle in Time hits theaters one week from today. It's one of many books to hit the silver screen this year. This Friday Roundtable includes three book and film fanatics who shared their greatest hopes and biggest fears about books becoming movies. On the eve of the Academy Awards they talked about some of the best page-to-screen adaptations, the books that should never be made into movies and what it takes to get it right.
View episode
Duke Divinity historian and author Kate Bowler was diagnosed with stage IV cancer at the age of 35. Her new book "Everything Happens for a Reason" is a memoir of her experience with death, grief, loss and faith.
View episode
Change has been slow in coming to corporate boards. Two thirds of all of the corporate board seats on Fortune 500 companies are held by white men. And believe it or not that represents progress. So why have boards been so slow to bring in more women and people of color? Elizabeth Stapp, instructor on business ethics and social impact at the University of Colorado Boulder, joined the program to discuss how a more diverse board shapes a company's performance.
View episode
She joined host Kerri Miller to talk about her book, "Everything Here is Beautiful."
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to author Randy Ribay about his book, "After the Shot Drops" and the difficulties of adolescent male friendship in a culture of toxic masculinity.
View episode
The Mueller investigation has spawned fierce political debates. Meanwhile Russia is mounting plans to hack our 2018 midterms. What is Russia doing? How can the U.S. protect its elections? MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to Russia and information warfare expert Molly McKew of Fianna Strategies about Russia's cyber disinformation tactics.
View episode
Stephanie Curtis spoke to Political Junkie podcast host Ken Rudin about the latest political news.
View episode
The 19 year-old shooter who killed 17 classmates and teachers in Parkland, Florida had no diagnosed mental illness. But his actions have sparked calls for more attention to mental health in the U.S. John Snook of the Treatment Advocacy Center and Amy Barnhorst of the University of California, Davis joined host Stephanie Curtis to talk about mental health care and stigma.
View episode
The deadline for Congress to act on DACA is just days away. Today on the Friday roundtable, we're talking about immigration. MPR News Host Kerri Miller spoke with a lawyer, faith leader and economist about the fate of the Dreamers as well as the ethics and economics of immigration.
View episode
The students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas have received national attention from politicians, lawmakers, media and celebrities as they call for gun reform. Are we seeing a new generation of activism? Can protest actually lead to real change? Aimee Allison, president of Democracy in Color, and James Farnsworth, student activist from the University of Minnesota, joined host Kerri Miller for a discussion about student activism.
View episode
Evangelist pastor Billy Graham passed away at age 99. Graham's ministry headquarters were based in Minneapolis for more than 50 years.
View episode
Whether or not women should serve as pastors or spiritual leaders is something that the Christian community has long debated. MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to Rachel Held Evans and Lisa Sharon Harper about how women are viewed and treated by the church. Evans is a columnist and author of "A Year of Biblical Womanhood." Harper is a speaker, activist, and author of "The Very Good Gospel."
View episode
School shootings are becoming a regular occurrence in America. Is there anything that can be done to make schools safer? MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with two school security experts, including the mother of a Sandy Hook victim, about what can be done to protect students in an era of regular mass shootings.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to New York Times Book Review editor Pamela Paul and Gene Luen Yang, National Ambassador for Young People's Literature, about how to raise a reader. This is a rebroadcast.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller led a roundtable discussion on the cost of college tuition with Sharon Smith-Akinsanya, founder of the People of Color Career Fair, Trey Williams, director of TRIO/Student Support Services at Carleton College, and Isaac Jahraus, president of Lead MN.
View episode
Patrice Banks is a self-described "former auto airhead" who now runs Girls Auto Clinic, a Philadelphia-area repair shop and salon that caters to women. In her new book, "Girls Auto Clinic Glove Box Guide," Banks shares tips for everything from maintaining your ride to finding a fair deal at the mechanic. She spoke with MPR News host Kerri Miller about her transformation.
View episode
Political Junkie Ken Rudin joined host Kerri Miller for their weekly politics discussion.
View episode
We're talking jobs this week on Flyover. Specifically, tax breaks and other government incentives given to private companies to bring jobs to your communities. Is that a good deal for you? Is this the way to a stronger economy? Our guests were Wisconsin Public Radio reporter Shawn Johnson; Matthew Mitchell, director of George Mason University's "Project for the Study of American Capitalism"; and William "Sandy" Darity, public policy professor at Duke University. This was rebroadcasted on Feb. 12, 2018.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with three musicians about the performances that shaped their careers. Guests: Brother Ali, a hip hop artist and activist. John Munson, a bassist and songwriter. He's best known for his work with Semisonic, Trip Shakespeare and The New Standards. Cameron Kinghorn, leader of the funk ensemble Nooky Jones. This is a rebroadcast.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke to anthropologist Jose Santos, who researches masculinity, and Robin Schooling, a human resources expert, about how people can start to change the culture surrounding harassment. This is a rebroadcast from Oct. 2017.
View episode
A New York Times analysis, found that African-Americans and Latinos are two of the most underrepresented groups at top universities in the United States. In fact, the percentage of first year students who are African-American or Latino at elite colleges has barely budged in more than 30 years. Director of Higher Education Research and Data Analytics for the Education Trust, Dr. Andrew Nichols, and Gregory Anderson, Dean and Professor of Higher Education at Temple University's College of Education, joined MPR News Host Kerri Miller to discuss what else the data teaches us about diversity. This is a rebroadcast.
View episode
Danez Smith said that a poet's duty is "to make sure that there's a record of what it meant to live, love, fight, rebel and be." Lately, Smith can't talk about poetry without also addressing the political climate that surrounds it. Today on MPR News with Kerri Miller, poet and author of "Don't Call Us Dead." Smith spoke about the mission to "write America down" and why it's more crucial now than ever.
View episode
President Trump made waves during his first few weeks in office by issuing a travel ban, temporarily barring residents from several Muslim-majority nations from traveling to the United States. The ban was quickly challenged. The details were changed and then challenged again. The third and most recent iteration of this ban will go before the Supreme Court in the spring. CNN's Asha Rangappa joined Kerri Miller for a conversation about the details of the ban and why it is so contentious.
View episode
Amazon just announced the launch of a new health care company together with Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase. But how big is too big? Are companies like Amazon and Google our eras new monopolies? MPR News host Stephanie Curtis was joined by Lina Khan, director of Legal Policy at Open Markets Institute and Alex Shephard, a staff writer at The New Republic.
View episode
MPR News host Stephanie Curtis spoke to Ken Rudin, the host of the Political Junkie podcast, about the memo written by Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif. The memo raises questions about the legitimacy of the investigation into Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential election. Rudin spoke about the contents of the memo the Democratic response.
View episode
It's been a rough year in football, and not just for Vikings fans. The National Football League has had a two year drop in TV ratings. It's had to contend with a growing body of evidence about the risks of concussions. And protests during the national anthem caused deep fissures, even among fans rooting for the same team. Mark Leibovich, chief national correspondent for The New York Times, spoke with MPR's Stephanie Curtis about tumultuous times within the NFL.
View episode
As Minnesota and the rest of the country gears up to watch the Super Bowl, our guests discussed how new awareness of brain injuries is affecting football and other sports. Host Kerri Miller was joined by Dr. Uzma Samadani, associate professor of neurosurgery at the University of Minnesota, Mike Grant, head coach at Eden Prairie High School and Den Utecht a retired NFL player.
View episode
This is a conversation about having productive conversations with your partner when you don't see eye to eye. MPR News host Kerri Miller was joined by Daphne de Marneffe, a licensed clinical psychologist and author of the forthcoming book "The Rough Patch: Marriage and the Art of Living Together." Bill Doherty also joined the discussion, he's the director of the Marriage and Family Therapy Program at the University of Minnesota.
View episode
Sociology professor Ted Thornhill has received death threats because of the class, and he has police officers stationed outside his lecture hall. Thornhill joined MPR host Kerri Miller to talk about why he's teaching the course, and why he thinks it's necessary in today's political climate. Thornhill was joined by Chenjerai Kumanyika, assistant professor at Rutgers University.
View episode
Unemployment is low and the economy is doing well, but why are so many Americans unhappy? MPR News Host Kerri Miller spoke with Reed Galen, Chief Strategist of the Serve America Movement, and Lisa Garcia Bedolla, Director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at University of California Berkeley, about the relevance of tonight's address.
View episode
Ken Rudin joined host Kerri Miller for his weekly segment about politics, but this time a third guest joined to talk about DACA. Alan Gomez covers immigration for USA Today. He spoke to Kerri and Ken about what we can expect from Congress in the next few days.
View episode
An Associated Press analysis from December 2017 found that many charter schools across the country are racially segregated, and that the academic performance in those schools lags behind public schools. But a lot of parents, including parents of color, claim that charter schools are great alternatives to the public schools that have failed their children. Even if those charters are racially segregated. Host Kerri Miller spoke to policy director Brandie Burris-Gallagher of EdAllies, attorney Dan Shulman and Bernadeia Johnson, former superintendent of Minneapolis Public Schools.
View episode
Last week MPR News host Kerri Miller flew to Baltimore to moderate a forum on faith--but it's not what you're thinking. It wasn't a debate whether or not there is a god. There was no philosophical look at the meaning of life--and there certainly was not an in-depth discussion of theology. Instead, Miller moderated a real, raw conversation about why so many Americans are losing faith in their religious institutions.
View episode
MPR News unveiled more details into the abrupt end to MPR's decades-long relationship with Garrison Keillor, the creator of a Prairie Home Companion. In response to the reporting, the CEO of American Public Media (MPR's parent company) responded with an open letter to listeners that describes a pattern of behavior by Keillor. The MPR investigation and open letter detail what it was like to work under Keillor, but it also raised several larger questions about personal relationships, power dynamics and consent in the work place. MPR Host Kerri Miller spoke about the bright lines and gray areas of boundaries in the workplace with lawyer and Healing to Action co-founder Karla Altmayer and Chai Feldblum, commissioner of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
View episode
The Children's Health Insurance Program is one of the most popular bipartisan federal initiatives. So why is it being used as a political football in the budget bill debate? Joan Alker, executive director of the Center For Children and Families answered this question for guest host Stephanie Curtis.
View episode
It's hard to know what to say to someone who is grieving, but Gabrielle Birkner and Rebecca Soffer are trying to make those tough conversations a little easier. Their new book "Modern Loss. Candid Conversations about Grief. Beginners Welcome," is unlike any other book about death you've ever read--or perhaps, intentionally avoided. They spoke with lead producer and guest host, Marcheta Fornoff.
View episode
Ken Rudin joined the program as usual, but this time he chatted with MPR's political editor Mike Mulcahy about the government shutdown that has stretched into its third day.
View episode
Three climate-wise business minds joined chief meteorologist Paul Huttner to talk about the impact the changing climate has on businesses like Best Buy and Askov Finlayson.
View episode
Author and journalist, Ta-Nahesi Coates, wrote a piece in the Atlantic titled, "The First White President," where he argued President Trump's candidacy could endanger progress for Americans, especially Black Americans. Founder of BlackTableArts Keno Evol and professors Brian Lozenski and Charisse Burden-Stelly joined MPR News host Kerri Miller for the Friday Roundtable on Ta-Nahesi Coates and Black leadership.
View episode
After Oprah's moving Golden Globes speech social media was flooded with calls for her to run for president. She, like the current president, has no experience in public office, but is that necessary? Political science professors Samara Klar and Michael Fauntroy discussed the importance of experience in running for, and being successful in, public office.
View episode
Jeff Kahn, director of the Berman Institute of Bioethics, joined host Kerri Miller to discuss innovations in gene editing and the consequences that must be considered. This show was broadcasted out of WYPR in Balitmore.
View episode
Is immigration good or bad for the U.S. economy? MPR's Chris Farrell, in for host Kerri Miller, looked at the impact of immigrants on the economy with Randy Capps of the Migration Policy Institute and Shikha Dalmia of the Reason Foundation.
View episode
Ken Rudin of the podcast, Political Junkie, joined guest host Chris Farrell to talk politics.
View episode
How does someone's recognition of racial privilege influence their politics? MPR News host Kerri Miller talked to Ijeoma Oluo, the author of "So You Want to Talk About Race."
View episode
If you think of "Frankenstein" as B-movie horror kitsch, you're missing so much. It's been 200 years since Mary Shelley (at age 20!) penned the novel that raised enduring questions about science, mortality and what really makes us "human." For this week's Friday Roundtable, MPR News host Kerri Miller and her guests dive into the time period that inspired Shelly's work and why it continues to feel relevant today Guests: - Jennifer Alexander is Director of Graduate Studies in the History of Science, Technology Medicine at the University of Minnesota - Heidi Berg, Actor with Green T Productions and Museum Manager for Wells Fargo - Juliet Burba, Director of Exhibits and Collections at the Bakken Museum in Minneapolis
View episode
They say "timing is everything." So how do you make sure your timing is setting you up for success? This is a conversation with Daniel Pink, author of, "When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing."
View episode
Americans feel that the Democratic and Republican parites have more conflicts than people of different races and classes. That's according to a Pew Research poll. Suzanne Chod, a political science professor, spoke about why Americans might feel this way.
View episode
Clinical psychologist and author of "The Defining Decade," Meg Jay, joined MPR News Host Kerri Miller for a discussion on her latest book, "Supernormal," which tells the story of ordinary Americans that have overcome adversities.
View episode
Alexis Simendinger, White House correspondent for The Hill, joined the program.
View episode
Julie Sonier, president of MN Community Measurement, and Dr. Renee Hsia, director of Health Policy Studies at UCSF, discussed a new report that found a big range in the lowest and highest prices charged for common surgery producers in Minnesota.
View episode
Ken Rudin joined Kerri Miller for their weekly chat. This time they discussed a Pew Research poll. Americans believe the divide between Republicans and Democrats is strong--stronger than the divide between Americans of different races and classes.
View episode
When you're watching your favorite show or film on Netflix, do you ever think to yourself, "Wow, this guy or this girl is an amazing actor?" What is it about our favorite on-screen performers that make them great actors? Director Lauren Keating and actors Ansa Akea and Sha Cage joined host Kerri Miller to discuss.
View episode
When celebrities started speaking out against workplace sexual harassment, a group of Latina farmworkers wanted to make sure their voices were heard, too. We talked about why low-wage workers are vulnerable to sexual abuse and exploitation with journalist Susan Chira and lawyer Karla Altmayer.
View episode
Ruth Hayden, personal finance educator joined MPR News joined MPR News with Kerri Miller for consultation on money and finances.
View episode
Kerri Miller and Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie, look ahead to the mid-term election year of 2018 on the day that Sen. Al Franken leaves office.
View episode
University of Minnesota linguist Anatoly Liberman joined MPR News Host Kerri Miller to talk about why some words and phrases catch on, and whether the origins of those words are new or old. They also discussed Merriam Webster's 2017 "word of the year": feminism.
View episode
Despite unique hurdles, minority-owned businesses are sprouting at record levels, nationwide. MPR News Contributor Chris Farrell hosted a roundtable on what's driving that growth.
View episode
MPR News Contributor Chris Farrell, in for Kerri Miller, spoke with the Brookings Institution's Kavita Patel about the impact this repeal will have on health care coverage going forward.
View episode
The Republican tax bill has been signed into law. What made it into the final draft? And what got cut during negotiations? Senior editor at Forbes and "Tax Girl" Kelly Erb joined MPR News contributor Chris Farrell for a conversation about tax reform.
View episode
Dairy farmers might not compare themselves to asteroid hunters, but Carrie Nugent, a staff scientist at IPAC/Caltech writes about their similarities in her new book "Asteroid Hunters." She joins MPR News Producer Marcheta Fornoff about why it's important to have a team of scientists tracking asteroids and what we learn from their presence.
View episode
MPR's Chris Farrell talks with the Political Junkie, Ken Rudin, about the signing of the tax bill, the federal budget, and what to make of hints from Congress and the White House of bipartisanship in 2018.
View episode
For "MPR Day" in Moorhead, MPR News host Kerri Miller assembled a panel of food experts from the region at the Rourke Art Museum to talk about the traditions and ingredients that inspire them in the kitchen. This is a rebroadcast.
View episode
Boys and young men feel pressured to be unemotional and detached. This contributes to toxic masculinity and abusive behavior towards women. Guest host Jana Shortal discussed how to rewrite the rules of masculinity with MPR's Bob Collins, author Andrew Reiner and Ted Bunch of A Call To Men.
View episode
Three guests from around the globe joined guest host Stephanie Curtis to talk developments in each country.
View episode
Hate crimes rose 5 percent last year and an FBI report finds that most were committed by right wing extremists. Over half of those crimes were related to race or "perceived ethnicity" and just over 20 percent were related to religion. Guest host Jana Shortal, of KARE 11, was joined by journalists David Neiwert and Hannah Allam to discuss how these attacks impact America's Muslim population.
View episode
Ken Rudin, the Political Junkie joined guest host Stephanie Curtis to talk about the GOP tax bill and other political news.
View episode
Jonathan Eig's new biography of the heavyweight champ, "Ali: A Life," doesn't just examine the boxer as a sports figure. It puts his transformation from Cassius Clay to Mohammed Ali into an illuminating cultural and political context that Eig felt hasn't been explored in previous biographies. Eig spoke to Stephanie Curtis about his new book, which the Thread named one of the 10 best non-fiction books of 2017.
View episode
Looking for a gift for your young reader? We've got you covered. Local children's book experts Lisa Von Drasek and Holly Weinkauf joined MPR News senior producer Stephanie Curtis for a round up of the very best children's books of 2017, and listeners called in to share what books are on their children's lists this year.
View episode
How do we prevent abuse in health care facilities? MPR News Stephanie Curtis, filling in for Host Kerri Miller, facilitated a conversation on elderly rights.
View episode
Journalist and author Masha Gessen talked to MPR guest host Stephanie Curtis about her new book, "The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia." They took a deep look at the Russian mindset and the generational trauma that defines Russian politics and culture today.
View episode
The Atlantic's Vann R. Newkirk II says Alabama has a history of voter suppression, which will make it difficult for the Democratic candidate to get the black voters he needs.
View episode
Two guests talk about the merging of the Senate and House versions of the Republican tax overhaul.
View episode
Ken Rudin joined host Kerri Miller to chat about the week's political news which included U.S. Senator Al Franken (MN-DFL) announcing his resignation.
View episode
In the wave of recent sexual misconduct allegations against powerful men, what are young women hearing? MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with Karla Altmayer, co-founder and co-director of Healing to Action, and Carina Chocano, a contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine and author of "You Play the Girl."
View episode
After a diplomatic trip to Asia in early November, where President Trump visited China, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam and the Philippines, we're taking a look at President Trump's foreign agenda and the administration's strategy towards North Korea. Lastly, given that many international diplomats have been forced to resign by the Trump administration, what message is being sent to diplomats residing, here, in the United States?
View episode
Senator Al Franken has resigned after several women alleged he sexually harassed them. Listeners have called in to express a range of emotions. Some say Franken is a scapegoat. Today we spoke about what the political fallout from this resignation will be and what happens next with Kelly Dittmar, of Rutgers University, and Julian Zelizer, of Princeton. Then, Letters with digital producer Nancy Yang.
View episode
As the wave of allegations over sexual misconduct in politics, entertainment, media and music continue, Americans are confronting tough questions about power, gender and identity. This show will examine what we're learning about the pervasiveness of sexual harassment in everyday life and whether the #MeToo moment can usher in lasting change.
View episode
Home ownership has long been considered a part of the American Dream. In the 20th century, the mortgage interest deduction (MID) has incentivized that piece of the dream. But as part of the Republican tax overhaul, the MID is on the chopping block. Tax law Daniel Hemel helped break down the good and the bad of the MID and what Americans can expect to happen to the real estate market without it.
View episode
Omar El Akkad is no stranger to war. As a journalist, he wrote about the war in Afghanistan and covered the Arab Spring. Recently, he traded in fact for fiction, and wrote his debut novel "American War." This is a rebroadcast of his conversation with MPR News host Kerri Miller.
View episode
An analysis by the Associated Press found that segregation is rampant in charter schools--1,000 of the nation's 6,700 are 99 percent one race. Cornell professor Noliwe Rooks joined the program to talk why this is. She is the author of "Cutting School: Privatization, Segregation, and the End of Public Education."
View episode
In his new book "How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds," Alan Jacobs explores an act - thinking - that's familiar to all of us. But he argues that when it comes to the big issues dividing our society, we don't always think well.
View episode
MPR News host Kerri Miller talked with Political Junkie Ken Rudin about the latest news surrounding sexual harassment in Washington, including Nancy Pelosi's call that Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.) resign after several allegations of sexual misconduct. They also discussed President Trump's retweets of anti-Muslim videos from a far-right group in Britain. Later in the segment, MPR News digital producer Nancy Yang joined Kerri to read some recent mail from listeners, much of it about the ongoing wave of sexual harassment allegations in media and politics.
View episode
MPR's Euan Kerr and Stephanie Curtis talked about their favorite holiday movies.
View episode
Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell spoke with Nate Foster from Cornell University about why "net neutrality" rules were established and what the web would look like without them.
View episode
Yesterday Minnesota Public Radio severed ties with Garrison Keillor, amid accusations of sexual misconduct. Keillor is the latest high-profile man to be fired after facing such accusations. We spoke to Glenda Eoyang, a corporate culture expert, about why companies are forced to act quickly and what long-term impact this has on employee morale, and on the company's reputation. The conversation was hosted by Chris Farrell senior economics contributor for Marketplace.
View episode
A recent interview between Senator Franken and Cathy Wurzer drew some interesting feedback--especially from women. Wurzer heard from listeners who claimed she was too tough on Franken. Some said she wasn't the right choice for the interview. Like many of the women who have spoken out about alleged harassment our hosts have had their credibility questioned and been accused of political calculations. When it comes to sexual harassment, do we have one standard for politicians and a different one for everyone else? Tai Coleman and Caitlin Flanagan joined the show to discuss.
View episode
If you woke up this morning feeling less than refreshed, join the club - the CDC reports that more than a third of American adults don't get enough sleep. But as scientists are discovering, chronic under-sleeping can cost you big in the long run.
View episode
A Thread Book Hour featuring Kerri Miller's "Talking Volumes" interview with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ron Chernow. His newest book is titled, "Grant." This hour aired on MPR News Presents on Nov. 8.
View episode
Ken Rudin joins MPR News host Kerri Miller every Monday to talk about the week's political news.
View episode
Are poor and first-generation students being dissuaded and taken off the college track? Linda F. Nathan joined MPR News with Kerri Miller to discuss her latest book, "When Grit Isn't Enough: A High School Principal Examines How Poverty and Inequality Thwart the College-For-All Promise."
View episode
This week on Flyover, we hear some of the most thoughtful calls we've received in the last 12 weeks from listeners across the country. People responded in droves to our conversations about some of the most urgent issues of our day and shared honest experiences about guns, race, religion, health care and much more. Host Kerri Miller asks Jose Santos, an anthropologist and assistant professor at Metropolitan State University, to analyze what we've heard and what it says about American identity today.
View episode
Were you banned from the Thanksgiving table because you were talking politics? Univ. of Minn. family therapist Prof. Bill Doherty joins Kerri Miller with some concrete advice for making conversations about divisive topics productive during the holidays.
View episode
Andy Slavitt was the Acting Administrator for the Centers for Medicare Medicaid under the Obama administration. He is now a Special Advisor to the equity firm General Atlantic.He spoke to host Kerri Miller about about potential cuts to Medicaid.
This podcast could use a review!

This podcast could use a review! Have anything to say about it? Share your thoughts using the button below.

Submit Review
You might also like
Ann Friedman and Aminatou Sow
Public Radio International
Robert Andersson
Panoply; The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
The Network Studios